Title

Cultivating the Imagined Wilderness: Contested Native American Plant-Gathering Traditions in America’s National Parks

Published In

Plants, People, and Places: The Roles of Ethnobotany and Ethnoecology in Indigenous Peoples' Land Rights in Canada and Beyond

Document Type

Book Chapter

Publication Date

8-2020

Abstract

In myriad ways, the creation of national parks in the United States not only displaced Native peoples but also displaced traditional ecological practices that had sustained Indigenous peoples and ecosystems in what are today parklands. These effects reflected a Western worldview that interpreted North America as a wild, rather than a meaningfully inhabited, landscape. Over time, in many places, this fiction was made manifest as Native people were displaced from “wilderness” parks and as plant communities were changed in ways that often concealed scenic vistas, increased fire hazards, reduced biological diversity and resiliency, and otherwise detracted from the ecological and.....

Rights

Copyrighted by McGill-Queen's University Press

Description

Chapter 13 in the book, Plants, People, and Places: The Roles of Ethnobotany and Ethnoecology in Indigenous Peoples' Land Rights in Canada and Beyond

DOI

10.2307/j.ctv153k6x6.21

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/34492

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