People and Plants in the American Far West: Synthesizing Archaeobotanical Data from Oregon's Great Basin

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Date

4-7-2022

Abstract

Archaeobotanical data from sites in the Great Basin and surrounding areas have demonstrated the persistent and continuous presence of specific plant taxa in cultural features over millennia. In this talk, I will integrate diachronic datasets from several sites in the northern Great Basin to examine the role of plants in seasonal rounds, food preferences, and foraging decisions of people in the past.

Biographical Information

Jaime Kennedy (MS, 2010; PhD, 2018; University of Oregon) is the Interim Director of the Archaeological Research Division at the Museum of Natural and Cultural History. The division works with its state and federal agency partners to support cultural resource management efforts throughout the state, operates archaeological field schools, and conducts grant-supported archaeological research. Jaime’s primary research interests are in the archaeology of the Great Basin and Pacific Northwest, with an emphasis on the relationships between people and plants. She has analyzed archaeological plant remains from numerous sites in California, Oregon, and Washington, and published several of these studies in regional and national academic journals.

Subjects

Plant remains (Archaeology), Agriculture -- Prehistoric, Great Basin -- Antiquities, Indians of North America -- Great Basin

Disciplines

Anthropology | Archaeological Anthropology

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/37341

People and Plants in the American Far West: Synthesizing Archaeobotanical Data from Oregon's Great Basin

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