Title

The Duality of Human Experience: Perspectives From Psychosocial Adaptation to Chronic Illness and Disability-Historical Views and Theoretical Models

Published In

Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin

Document Type

Citation

Publication Date

1-1-2019

Abstract

This article examines the current views on the duality of the human experience as portrayed within the process of coping with and managing traumatic life events, with a special emphasis on those views associated with the onset, or diagnosis, of chronic illnesses and disabilities (CID). In this article, experiential dualities are reviewed with a focus on (a) broadly defined modes of psychosocial adaptation to CID, such as coping versus succumbing, and disabled versus nondisabled selves; (b) models of denial, which often dichotomize its structure as reflecting complete or major versus partial or minor denial; and (c) models of personal growth following adversity and traumatic events, such as the onset or diagnosis of severe and life-threatening CID. Focus is placed on the dualities that dichotomize human functioning following traumatic experiences, along such categories as genuine or transcendent growth versus self-deception or illusory growth.

DOI

10.1177/0034355218800790

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/27588

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