First Advisor

Jeremy Spoon

Date of Award

6-16-2021

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) in Anthropology and University Honors

Department

Anthropology

Language

English

DOI

10.15760/honors.1071

Abstract

This paper utilizes fieldwork on the island of Gozo, Malta as a case study in understanding place-based environmental relationships. I employ a mixed methodology ethnographic approach to explore the disconnect between local narratives of hazard risk and those of larger institutional actors including the Maltese government, the EU, and the World Risk Index. This study reveals themes of: 1) language shaping climate discourse; 2) place-based oral histories and lore as impacting how risk is perceived; 3) tension between tradition and modernity in the realm of risk reduction; and 4) conflicting climate narratives characterizing the nature of preventative action. I argue that the acknowledgment of Gozitan localized knowledge in regard to climate and disaster—as opposed to conventionally recognized, technocratic knowledge—has the potential to reduce community vulnerability to hazards that prefigure calamity.

Rights

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Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35690

Included in

Anthropology Commons

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