First Advisor

Claire Wheeler

Date of Award

6-16-2021

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Public Health Studies: Clinical Health Sciences

Department

OHSU-PSU School of Public Health

Language

English

DOI

10.15760/honors.1128

Abstract

Diabetes continues to be one of the leading causes of death within the United States, with the Hispanic population having an especially high risk of developing diabetes. Understanding the different factors that may affect adherence to diabetes self-care, such as self-efficacy, duration of diabetes, and patient treatment satisfaction is important to reduce diabetes-related health complications. The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between patient self-efficacy for diabetes management and satisfaction with treatment, as well as whether the duration of diabetes is associated with self-efficacy for disease management. Baseline data was collected on 16 Hispanic patients with diabetes at a free clinic. Treatment satisfaction was measured using the Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire status (DTSQs) and self-efficacy was measured using the Perceived Diabetes Self-Management Scale (PDSMS). A significant positive correlation was found between diabetes treatment satisfaction (DTSQ) and self-efficacy (PDSMS). No significant relationship was found between duration of diabetes and self-efficacy. Our study results suggest that patients with high treatment satisfaction also have high self-efficacy levels, or vice versa. Diabetes healthcare providers looking to improve patient treatment satisfaction may benefit from implementing programs to improve patient self-efficacy. Conversely, healthcare providers looking to improve patient self-efficacy may benefit from addressing patients’ treatment satisfaction.

Rights

In Copyright. URI: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/ This Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights-holder(s).

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35783

Included in

Public Health Commons

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