First Advisor

Thomas V. Hancock

Date of Award

6-16-2021

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Biology and University Honors

Department

Biology

Language

English

DOI

10.15760/honors.1136

Abstract

Skeletal muscle has an innate ability to self-regenerate in response to certain stimuli. In the case of trauma, muscle resident stem cells are required to meet the regenerative needs of the tissue. These resident stem cells, called satellite cells (SCs), are crucial in the regenerative process following injury; understanding the major factors which regulate satellite cell activity can provide valuable insight for regenerative medicine. The ability to implement and properly activate satellite cells has immense potential in the treatment of conditions including trauma, degenerative disorders, and age-related sarcopenia. This review will discuss the current understanding of satellite cell-mediated regeneration and the related cellular and molecular dynamics involved in regulation. Lastly, current research in this area of regenerative medicine and implications for future clinical applications will be explored.

Rights

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Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35904

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