First Advisor

Nicholas A. Smith

Date of Award

Spring 6-2022

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Psychology and University Honors

Department

Psychology

Language

English

Subjects

intimate partner violence, domestic violence, Islam, Muslim, Muslim Community, IPV

DOI

10.15760/honors.1210

Abstract

Intimate partner violence is a complex issue that involves gender, race, sexuality, religion, and culture. Muslim communities are a combination of many identities and to be able to support the community, there needs to be a better understanding of how IPV is expressed within this population. This thesis reports findings from a survey distributed throughout Muslim networks and IPV organizations in the US. The results are based on 200 responses and demonstrate that individuals with a history of IPV have worse social and health outcomes. In addition, the source of IPV disclosure (e.g., healthcare provider, religious leader) depended on whether the IPV perpetrator was Muslim or non-Muslim. The top three barriers to seeking support for IPV were losing children, afraid of children getting hurt, and not wanting anyone to know.

Rights

© 2022 Areebah Zaidi

In Copyright. URI: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/ This Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights-holder(s).

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/37711

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