First Advisor

Tina Burdsall

Date of Award

Spring 5-27-2022

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Psychology and University Honors

Department

Psychology

Language

English

Subjects

Deaf, Deaf community, Interpreter Access, Health Care, In-person Interpreter, American Sign Language (ASL).

Abstract

It has been estimated that 1 out of every 20 Americans are Deaf or Hard of Hearing (HoH) (Mitchell, 2006).

More research is required to determine how people used ASL interpreters in medical settings but ran into complications with the process of accessing accommodations and interpreters. There is a lack of research that outlines the Deaf community’s preferences when it comes to interpretation options in medical settings. Additional research is required to determine what interpretation options would provide the most benefit and be the most accessible to members of the Deaf community, and all individuals with varying levels of hearing loss.

This thesis reviews current relevant research on the issues of interpreter access for members of the Deaf community, presents the results of a pilot study investigating the Deaf community’s preferred interpretation options, as well as providing a template for a proposed future research study.

The pilot study used Likert Scale questions, but this thesis did not analyze the data or draw any conclusions because participation was too low due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The focus of this study changed to propose a future research study that follows the structure of the pilot study with some improvements and suggestions that could be used to create a relevant and repeatable research study.

Included in

Psychology Commons

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