Date of Award

8-1-2017

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Environmental Studies and University Honors

Department

Environmental Science and Management

First Advisor

Lindsay Skog

Subjects

Environmental sciences -- Study and teaching (Higher) -- Political aspects, Portland State University. Department of Environmental Science and Management -- Curricula, Traditional ecological knowledge, Multicultural education

DOI

10.15760/honors.466

Abstract

I critically consider Portland State University’s Environmental Science and Management (ESM) department’s strategies in presenting Western scientific and Indigenous knowledge in regard to environmental management and interaction through the ESM department's core curriculum. I conduct qualitative primary research through semi-structured interviews with two faculty members from the ESM department, an ESM student, and a faculty member in the Nation Studies department. The interviews illustrate the gap in the ESM's core curriculum where multicultural perspectives are not represented. My research works to understand this gap by considering the historical, political, and economic constructs for the ways in which knowledge systems of the subaltern are marginalized. Finally, this thesis prescribes the integration of Native American traditional ecological knowledge through a focused course offered in the ESM core curriculum to counter these systems.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/21075

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