Date of Award

11-22-2019

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Psychology and University Honors

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

J. Forrest Williams

Subjects

Bondage (Sexual behavior) -- Psychological aspects, Sadomasochism -- Psychological aspects, Sexual dominance and submission -- Psychological aspects, Helping behavior, Sexual minorities -- Cultural aspects

DOI

10.15760/honors.837

Abstract

While previous research has studied the impact of stigma and non-normative play within the BDSM and kink community, previous psychological research involving BDSM practitioners has not investigated the cultural practice of aftercare that tends to follow the highly sensationalized acts within the culture. The current study this cultural practice by giving a series of semi-structured interviews to assess the importance of aftercare and how it impacts negotiations and play. BDSM practitioners (n = 11) participated in audio recorded interviews regarding questions on identity, kink, aftercare, consent, and negotiation. 72.73% of individuals rated aftercare as mostly to largely important in their lives. Aftercare presented itself in a variety of ways including physical affection, verbal affirmation, and acts of service.

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/32541

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