First Advisor

Marcus Sharpe

Date of Award

2-26-2021

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Psychology and University Honors

Department

Psychology

Language

English

Subjects

transitional justice, restorative justice, transformative justice, African-American

DOI

10.15760/honors.996

Abstract

Racism is still deeply embedded in the United States. Dominant white cultural narratives do not acknowledge African-Americans’ experiences, and previous methods of addressing it have not been sufficient. Through a literature review using PsychInfo, Google Scholar, and Google the author researched how transitional, restorative, and transformative justice have been used in the U.S. and other countries to establish what methods of each would be best adopted for the U.S. The author proposes change through addressing racism on the state and county level using these multiple levels of justice throughout the U.S. to create space to perpetuate conversations, actions, and beginning community healing. Methods of justice that enforce truth-telling, acknowledgement of the human right’s abuses against African-Americans, and respectful open conversations are what will move the U.S. to holistically start to heal the trauma inflicted in the African-American population.

Rights

In Copyright. URI: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/ This Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights-holder(s).

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35151

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