First Advisor

Kristin Hole

Date of Award

2-26-2021

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) in English and University Honors

Department

English

Language

English

Subjects

Experimental Film, Surveillance, Critical Theory, Race, Visual Politics

DOI

10.15760/honors.997

Abstract

Along with shifts in how surveillance technologies work to control and capitalize on everyday life comes a need to understand and critique them. What past and present paranoid dystopian stories and other pop-culture parables seem to leave out is any thoughtful consideration of how surveillance racializes bodies and consolidates power in favor of racist hegemony, specifically in a post-9/11 context. We often fail to question in what ways popular discourse on surveillance and resistance to surveillance practices reinforce violence against--and consolidate control over--marginalized populations. Part of this almost willful negligence, I believe, is symptomatic of visibility’s status as a both taken-for-granted and also privileged site of knowledge and as a medium of objective truth and a vehicle for power. Three artists--Ja'Tovia Gary, Basma Alsharif, and Hito Steyerl--bring forth a fresh analysis congruous with our contemporary moment, in which surveillance has shifted from disciplining through visual strategies to combining visual, informational, and affective modes of control.

Rights

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Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35152

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