First Advisor

Tanner Cooke

Date of Award

8-18-2020

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) in Communication Studies and University Honors

Department

Communication

Language

English

DOI

10.15760/honors.1010

Abstract

This thesis examines the relationship between late-night comedy news shows and their audiences, in terms of how they impact public opinion, political attentiveness and civic engagement. It looks at how the genre of late night political comedy is not a monolith, and neither is its audiences, and addresses the different ways these two interact with one another. Through an in-depth literature review, this thesis finds that late night political comedy has the most impact on politically inattentive audiences who end up learning about politics inadvertently, and that the jokes featured on these shows actively primes these viewers to hold certain views on political candidates and systems. The research points to key communication and humor theories that help explain these findings.

Rights

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Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35457

Included in

Communication Commons

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