Start Date

25-7-2014 9:15 AM

End Date

25-7-2014 10:15 AM

Subjects

Information literacy -- Study and teaching, Critical thinking, Information services -- User education, Wikipedia

Description

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate which learning targets can be achieved by using Wikipedia as a tool for teaching information literacy within the context of brief one-shot library instruction sessions.

Design/methodology/approach – In this case study, a Wikipedia-editing activity was incorporated into 2-hour one-shot instruction sessions. A variety of qualitative data were collected during these sessions: Student reflections during a facilitated discussion, student responses to exit-survey questions and instructor observations about the extent to which students completed Wikipedia-editing tasks.

Findings – Students found Wikipedia-editing activities and Wikipedia-related discussions engaging, and as a result they seemed to learn valuable lessons about research and writing. Students participating in this project effectively identified gaps in Wikipedia entries, critically evaluated and used sources to address those gaps and appropriately documented those materials. Students were easily encouraged to be critical about information sources, including Wikipedia and the more traditionally scholarly resources alike.

Originality/value – While a great deal of attention has been paid to teaching with multi-week Wikipedia assignments and coursework, evidence from this project suggests that Wikipedia-related activities can be used effectively within much narrower time constraints, including during brief one-shot library instruction sessions.

The presentation associated with this event can be accessed at http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/14546.

Notes

This is the authors' accepted version of an article that was subsequently published in Reference Services Review, Volume 43 Issue 1 by Emerald Group Publishing. The version of record may be found at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/RSR-10-2014-0043. Published under the title "One-shot Wikipedia: an edit-sprint toward information literacy."

This article is (c) Emerald Group Publishing and permission has been granted for this version to appear here (http://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/). Emerald does not grant permission for this article to be further copied/distributed or hosted elsewhere without the express permission from Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/14513

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Jul 25th, 9:15 AM Jul 25th, 10:15 AM

Let Wikipedia through the Gates!: A Trojan Horse Approach to Information Literacy

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate which learning targets can be achieved by using Wikipedia as a tool for teaching information literacy within the context of brief one-shot library instruction sessions.

Design/methodology/approach – In this case study, a Wikipedia-editing activity was incorporated into 2-hour one-shot instruction sessions. A variety of qualitative data were collected during these sessions: Student reflections during a facilitated discussion, student responses to exit-survey questions and instructor observations about the extent to which students completed Wikipedia-editing tasks.

Findings – Students found Wikipedia-editing activities and Wikipedia-related discussions engaging, and as a result they seemed to learn valuable lessons about research and writing. Students participating in this project effectively identified gaps in Wikipedia entries, critically evaluated and used sources to address those gaps and appropriately documented those materials. Students were easily encouraged to be critical about information sources, including Wikipedia and the more traditionally scholarly resources alike.

Originality/value – While a great deal of attention has been paid to teaching with multi-week Wikipedia assignments and coursework, evidence from this project suggests that Wikipedia-related activities can be used effectively within much narrower time constraints, including during brief one-shot library instruction sessions.

The presentation associated with this event can be accessed at http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/14546.