Date of Award

1-1-1965

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science in Teaching (M.S.T.)

Department

Education

Physical Description

1 online resource (vi, 64 l.)

Subjects

Student activities, Education -- Oregon -- Washington County

DOI

10.15760/etd.226

Abstract

The objectives of this study were to, (1) review the opinions of contemporary American educators regarding activity programs in our secondary schools; (2) investigate the activity programs currently provided in the junior and senior high schools in Washington County, Oregon; and (3) offer some suggestions based upon this information. The literature in this field, although somewhat limited, except for periodicals, acquainted the reader with the general area and provided a basis for the review and study of the present practices in Washington County. The data concerning the practices in the schools studied was obtained through a questionnaire which was personally distributed and collected. The results were tabulated on 22 tables from which a narrative synopsis of pertinent information was drawn. For example. at the junior high level, five schools engage in interscholastic sports; all eight schools have assemblies; three schools maintain a homeroom activity; all eight schools offer vocal music; and the two largest schools have more special interest clubs than any of the others. At the senior high level, all schools engage in interscholastic athletic competition; three schools have intramural sports; two schools do not have a marching band; and six schools publish more than a yearbook and newspaper. As a result of the review of what is currently done in the secondary schools of Washington County, and viewed in the perspective gained by the study of the Literature in this field, ten suggestions that might improve the current programs in some schools are provided for the decision-making personnel of the school districts and schools of the County. The highlights of these suggestions are: 1. That each school establish criteria by which it annually evaluates its activity program. 2. That workshops be established to discuss student needs. 3. That a census of both student participation and teacher skills be taken. 4. That junior and senior high schools work closely to allow beginning skills and interests to be carried over in the advanced grades. s. That school districts investigate programs in other geographical areas and make activity information available to those interested. 6. That schools provide a wide range of activities that may offer carry-over recreational possibilities for adult life.

Description

Portland State University. Division of Education

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/8104

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