Advisor

Maria Talbott

Date of Award

Spring 5-24-2016

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Social Work and Social Research

Department

Social Work

Physical Description

1 online resource (vi, 263 pages)

Subjects

Psychological tests -- Design, Psychological tests -- Evaluation, Mental health -- Social aspects

DOI

10.15760/etd.2921

Abstract

Mental health recovery is a complex phenomenon involving clinical, functional, physical, and social dimensions. The social dimension is understood to involve meaningful relationships and integration with supportive individuals and a wider community. While the recovery model developed from a movement led by consumers and survivors of the mental health system to promote hope, self-determination, and social inclusion, the clinical aspects of recovery have dominated mental health research and practice. The under-investigated area of social recovery calls for psychometrically sound measurement instruments. The purpose of the current study was to develop and validate the Social Recovery Measure (SRM). The study was grounded in disability and mad theories which locate disability at the intersection of the person and the environment. The SRM is a 19-item self-administered instrument scored on a 5-point Likert scale that consists of two domains: Self and Community.

Items for the SRM were developed through focus groups and interviews with 41 individuals in recovery from mental health challenges and the preliminary measure was administered to a purposive, nonprobability sample of 228 individuals in recovery. A confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted and a re-specified model resulted in good model fit. The SRM exhibited excellent internal consistency with a Cronbach's coefficient alpha of .951 and demonstrated excellent test-retest reliability, content validity, and construct validity.

Social recovery is highly relevant for social work given the discipline's commitment to disenfranchised populations and investment in creating enabling environments. The SRM has utility for use in evidence based practice and evaluation. The SRM can be used to further research in social recovery, test underlying theory bases, and explore the differential effects of the multiple dimensions of recovery. There is a need to better understand social recovery which this measure can facilitate.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/17476

Included in

Social Work Commons

Share

COinS