Advisor

Earle H. MacCannell

Date of Award

1983

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (M.S.) in Sociology

Department

Sociology

Physical Description

1 online resource (87 p.)

Subjects

Crime, Criminals, Crime and criminals -- Oregon

DOI

10.15760/etd.3271

Abstract

Crime as a social phenomenon has customarily been examined as sets of occurrences which happen outside the boundaries of the legitimate social structure. Research by Lawrence E. Cohen and Marcus Felson suggests that more fruitful explanatory models of crime may be developed from the routine activity approach, an approach which regards crime as a routine activity in the same sense that everyday work may be regarded as routine activity. Such an approach is consonant with the precepts of human ecology. Human ecology as a theoretical model posits an interrelationship among the divergent parts of the social fabric. In such a scenario crime is regarded as another manifestation of a symbiotic social interrelation, one among many that flourish in the social whole. Crime, in this approach, is a routine activity, just as work is a routine activity.

Description

If you are the rightful copyright holder of this dissertation or thesis and wish to have it removed from the Open Access Collection, please submit a request to pdxscholar@pdx.edu and include clear identification of the work, preferably with URL

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/18779

Included in

Criminology Commons

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