Advisor

Larry R. Martinez

Date of Award

8-14-2019

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (M.S.) in Psychology

Department

Psychology

Physical Description

1 online resource (iv, 87 pages)

Abstract

The number of individuals who identify as a non-binary gender has almost tripled over the last 10 years. This growing population, and the legal protection against sex discrimination afforded to them under Title VII, puts a responsibility on employers to better understand their experiences in the workplace. The purpose of the current study was to examine how disclosing a non-binary gender identity when applying for jobs influenced hiring outcomes. Specifically, my study assessed (a) hiring managers' beliefs about non-binary gender identities, (b) how those beliefs impacted hiring managers' perceived ability to provide social support to prospective applicants, and (c) how those beliefs and perceptions subsequently impacted their evaluations of and hiring intentions toward applicants who did or did not disclose a non-binary gender identity. I randomly assigned participants to one of four conditions ([self-disclosure: yes vs. no] x [other disclosure: yes vs. no]) and asked them to evaluate applicants via an online experiment. Although results did not reveal a significant effect of disclosure on hiring and support outcomes or a significant indirect effect of disclosure on hiring outcomes through support, there was a conditional indirect effect for one method of disclosure. I discuss theoretical and practical implications, study limitations, and avenues for future research.

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/30501

Available for download on Friday, August 14, 2020

Included in

Psychology Commons

Share

COinS