Title

Night Office

First Advisor

Michele Glazer

Term of Graduation

Winter 2020

Date of Publication

4-22-2020

Document Type

Closed Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) in Creative Writing

Department

English

Language

English

Subjects

Intersectionality (Sociology) -- Poetry

DOI

10.15760/etd.7308

Physical Description

1 online resources (iv, 53 pages)

Abstract

No poem is a fixed point on an axis. It was only when I discovered this phenomenon that I became interested in exploring the intersectionality of poetry. Much of this collection of poems attempts to find the overlap between dream, memory, creativity, music, loss and love. The title Night Office, an old translation of the Christian liturgical prayer Nocturne, was conceived as an intersectional point between prayer, music and the creative and physical space that embodied this poetic enterprise. For someone who habitually writes mostly at night time, this title resonated with me. The paradox in this title is that any creative space is both introspective and expansive, both material and immaterial and seemingly inhabits both the inner and outer worlds simultaneously. To step into one's "night office" is to be where exactly?

Speaking of one's poetics can be a shifty subject. Describing one's voice can be even more elusive. Throughout this thesis, I tried to make a concerted effort to experiment stylistically from the collage poem, for a lack of better description, to poems with a more condensed, fragmented or lyrical tone. Consistent, hopefully, in this collection is a close attention to the individual line. I consider myself, at heart, a devotee of the Imagist tradition of poetry -- that is, someone who believes in the power of the image as the basic unit of the poem. Often the voice in these poems takes creative leaps from idea to idea, something that I have found stimulating and rich as both a writer and lover of verse.

Rights

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Comments

This thesis is only available to students, faculty and staff at PSU.

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/33050

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