First Advisor

Larry R. Martinez

Term of Graduation

Winter 2021

Date of Publication

4-9-2021

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (M.S.) in Psychology

Department

Psychology

Language

English

Subjects

Bisexuals, Creative ability, Creative thinking, Personnel management, Supervisors -- Attitudes

Physical Description

1 online resource (v, 61 pages)

Abstract

Creativity is essential for organizations to remain competitive and profitable. Past evidence suggests diversity in organizations promotes creativity, however, the mechanisms through which diversity promotes creativity in the workplace are not yet understood. Diverse populations' unique experiences may promote creativity, particularly through cognitive flexibility. I investigate the potential for heightened creativity in diverse populations within the context of bisexuality. Specifically, I use the flexibility model of bisexuality to explain why bisexual employees may have greater cognitive flexibility and subsequent creativity than heterosexual employees. Additionally, I seek to understand the moderating role of supervisor support in this relationship. Participants were recruited using snowball sampling methods and Amazon's Mechanical Turk. I did not find evidence that bisexual employees have greater cognitive flexibility and subsequent creativity than heterosexual employees, nor was this relationship moderated by supervisor support. My study contributes to the limited research surrounding the experiences of bisexual employees, presents further insight into how diversity can promote positive organizational outcomes such as creativity, and provides directions for future research.

Rights

© Megan Jane Snoeyink

In Copyright. URI: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/ This Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights-holder(s).

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35549

Included in

Psychology Commons

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