Advisor

Keith James

Date of Award

Winter 4-17-2013

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (M.S.) in Psychology

Department

Psychology

Physical Description

1 online resource (vii, 114 pages)

Subjects

Science -- Study and teaching -- Cross-cultural studies, Indians of North America -- Attitudes -- Education, Scientists -- Attitudes, Science -- Public opinion, Sustainability -- Public opinion

DOI

10.15760/etd.674

Abstract

Science has been identified as a crucial element in the competitiveness and sustainability of America in the global economy. American citizens, especially minority populations, however, are not pursuing science education or careers. Past research has implicated `attitudes toward science' as an important factor in the public's participation in science. I applied Ajzen's (1991) Theory of Planned Behavior to attitudes toward science to predict science-related sustainability-action intentions and evaluated whether scientists and Native Americans differed in their general attitudes toward science, cultural values, and specific beliefs about science. Analyses revealed that positive attitude toward science and the cultural value of individualism predicted intentions to engage with science-related sustainability actions. Unexpectedly, scientists and Native Americans did not differ in their cultural values or positive attitude toward science. However, Natives Americans held significantly more negative attitude toward science than scientists. Implications for science education and attitudes towards science theory and application are discussed.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/9357

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