Start Date

9-4-2021 3:15 PM

End Date

9-4-2021 4:50 PM

Disciplines

History | Political Science

Subjects

Mexico -- History -- Conquest (1519-1540), Mexico -- Civilization, Aztecs -- History -- 16th century, Aztecs -- Mexico -- Rites and ceremonies, Aztecs -- Mexico -- Social life and customs, Aztecs -- Social life and customs -- History

Description

The fall of the Aztec Empire in 1521 was a surprising feat given the well-known, vast power, and fighting capabilities of the Aztec people. Many questions since then have arisen as to how such a mighty empire had so rapidly fallen. These theories hold implications that the Aztecs were victims to the incoming disease, famine, and domination inflicted by the Spanish conquistador, Hernan Cortes. Alongside these proposals I suggest that by examining archaeological and historical evidence, the Aztec traditional practices were also responsible for its society’s collapse. By identifying the significance of the human sacrifices, the cultural, political, and economical ramifications lead a straight line to the destruction of this massive civilization. Taking into account some major hypothesis in the causation of this society’s downfall, I further examine the capabilities of Aztec technology and their possible weaknesses that may have suggested other factors contributing to their defeat. By exposing the causes behind the frequency and procedures with which the Aztec practices their rituals of human sacrifice, conclusions can be drawn about the cause of the fall of the Aztec empire.

PART OF SESSION 4A. SOCIETY AT WAR:

Comment: Charity Urbanski, University of Washington
Chair: Dane J. Cash, Carroll College

Melina Arciniega, University of Alaska Fairbanks, undergraduate student
“Born and Bred in Blood: The Fall of the Aztec Empire”

Rebecca Devereaux, Whitworth University, undergraduate student
“Charlemagne: Nuancing the Conventional Narrative”

Luke Lambert, Gonzaga University, undergraduate student
“Sicut Regale: An Analysis of the Sovereignty and Rule of the Welsh Marcher Lords”

Craig J. Verniest, Seattle University, undergraduate student
“The Manifestation of Total War in the Mexican Revolution”

Rights

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

In Copyright. URI: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/ This Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights-holder(s).

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35215

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Apr 9th, 3:15 PM Apr 9th, 4:50 PM

Born and Bred in Blood: The Fall of the Aztec Empire

The fall of the Aztec Empire in 1521 was a surprising feat given the well-known, vast power, and fighting capabilities of the Aztec people. Many questions since then have arisen as to how such a mighty empire had so rapidly fallen. These theories hold implications that the Aztecs were victims to the incoming disease, famine, and domination inflicted by the Spanish conquistador, Hernan Cortes. Alongside these proposals I suggest that by examining archaeological and historical evidence, the Aztec traditional practices were also responsible for its society’s collapse. By identifying the significance of the human sacrifices, the cultural, political, and economical ramifications lead a straight line to the destruction of this massive civilization. Taking into account some major hypothesis in the causation of this society’s downfall, I further examine the capabilities of Aztec technology and their possible weaknesses that may have suggested other factors contributing to their defeat. By exposing the causes behind the frequency and procedures with which the Aztec practices their rituals of human sacrifice, conclusions can be drawn about the cause of the fall of the Aztec empire.

PART OF SESSION 4A. SOCIETY AT WAR:

Comment: Charity Urbanski, University of Washington
Chair: Dane J. Cash, Carroll College

Melina Arciniega, University of Alaska Fairbanks, undergraduate student
“Born and Bred in Blood: The Fall of the Aztec Empire”

Rebecca Devereaux, Whitworth University, undergraduate student
“Charlemagne: Nuancing the Conventional Narrative”

Luke Lambert, Gonzaga University, undergraduate student
“Sicut Regale: An Analysis of the Sovereignty and Rule of the Welsh Marcher Lords”

Craig J. Verniest, Seattle University, undergraduate student
“The Manifestation of Total War in the Mexican Revolution”