Start Date

9-4-2021 10:45 AM

End Date

9-4-2021 12:00 PM

Disciplines

History

Subjects

Rio Grande Valley (Colo.-Mexico and Tex.) -- History -- 19th century, Rio Grande Valley (Colo.-Mexico and Tex.) -- Social conditions -- 19th century, Mexican-American Border Region -- History -- 19th century, Mexico -- Relations -- Texas, Texas -- Relations -- Mexico, Victorio (Apache Chief -1880), Indians of North America -- Wars -- 1866-1895, Chiricahua Indians -- Wars

Description

This proposal is part of a greater thesis, but the specific proposal here will entail the specific defeat of Victorio around the Mexican American border lands region. Victorio was a warm springs Apache, which was part of the Chiricahua group. The time frame will be late summer 1880 to mid-October 1880. The paper will argue that the increased militarization of the Mexican American border in late summer until mid-October 1880 resulted in the death and defeat of Victorio. It will argue that the despite this increased militarization the border was still soft enough to allow him to cross easily avoiding both the Americans, and Mexicans pursuing him. The border around mid-September 1880 was finally closed enough to prevent him from escaping across the other side. This was due to a cross border campaign that allowed the Americans into Mexico to help the Mexican army defeat Victorio. The Americans were asked to leave before he was defeated, but their presence before that event was enough to help influence Victorio’s defeat. The paper will include numerous illegal border crossings on part of the Americans, and cooperation on part of Mexico with America. Those activities will show that both sides knew only a cross border campaign was the way to defeat Victorio.

PART OF SESSION 2C. INDIAN WARS:

Comment: J. William T. Youngs, Eastern Washington University
Chair: Roger Wiblin, Brigham Young University-Idaho

Brant Gorham, University of Idaho, undergraduate student
“We were Like Deer, They were Like Grizzly Bears: How the United States Government Stole Nez Perce Land and along with it Tribal Culture and Sovereignty”

Dameon Hansen, Idaho State University, graduate student
“Evolution of the Mexican American Border: How the Victorio Campaign in 1880 Changed Mexican American Border Management”

Darren L. Letendre, Portland State University, undergraduate student
“A ‘Superlicious’ Feast: A Rhetorical Analysis of Davy Crockett’s Almanacs as an Early Form of White National Identity”

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Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35230

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Apr 9th, 10:45 AM Apr 9th, 12:00 PM

Evolution of the Mexican American Border: How the Victorio Campaign in 1880 Changed Mexican American Border Management

This proposal is part of a greater thesis, but the specific proposal here will entail the specific defeat of Victorio around the Mexican American border lands region. Victorio was a warm springs Apache, which was part of the Chiricahua group. The time frame will be late summer 1880 to mid-October 1880. The paper will argue that the increased militarization of the Mexican American border in late summer until mid-October 1880 resulted in the death and defeat of Victorio. It will argue that the despite this increased militarization the border was still soft enough to allow him to cross easily avoiding both the Americans, and Mexicans pursuing him. The border around mid-September 1880 was finally closed enough to prevent him from escaping across the other side. This was due to a cross border campaign that allowed the Americans into Mexico to help the Mexican army defeat Victorio. The Americans were asked to leave before he was defeated, but their presence before that event was enough to help influence Victorio’s defeat. The paper will include numerous illegal border crossings on part of the Americans, and cooperation on part of Mexico with America. Those activities will show that both sides knew only a cross border campaign was the way to defeat Victorio.

PART OF SESSION 2C. INDIAN WARS:

Comment: J. William T. Youngs, Eastern Washington University
Chair: Roger Wiblin, Brigham Young University-Idaho

Brant Gorham, University of Idaho, undergraduate student
“We were Like Deer, They were Like Grizzly Bears: How the United States Government Stole Nez Perce Land and along with it Tribal Culture and Sovereignty”

Dameon Hansen, Idaho State University, graduate student
“Evolution of the Mexican American Border: How the Victorio Campaign in 1880 Changed Mexican American Border Management”

Darren L. Letendre, Portland State University, undergraduate student
“A ‘Superlicious’ Feast: A Rhetorical Analysis of Davy Crockett’s Almanacs as an Early Form of White National Identity”