Presenter Information

Emma Williams, University of Idaho

Start Date

9-4-2021 9:00 AM

End Date

9-4-2021 10:15 AM

Disciplines

History

Subjects

American portraits -- Political aspects, Propaganda, American art-- 18th century -- Analysis, Symbolism in art -- United States -- History

Description

The use of iconography to remember and honor military and political heroes has been in place since cave paintings. John Singleton Copley, Emanuel Leutze, Gilbert Stuart, and John Trumbull all used their talents to honor many of American Founding Fathers. Honored during and after their time, their work gives us a better understanding of what was valued and how these men were identified. The use of material culture allows for more portraiture, and the use of displaying socioeconomic standing. Copley, Leutze, Stuart, and Trumbull all had works used in political propaganda, and manipulation for years after. The images on today’s currency can trace their origin back to portraits completed by Copley. The way a person is arranged in a portrait, what they wear, what the background displays all show the artist is attempting to honor them. Whether it was one person or 50, an image from the Revolutionary era helps to solidify how the war was viewed by the artists.

PART OF SESSION 1C. PUBLIC COMMEMORATION:

Comment: Larry Cebula, Eastern Washington University
Chair: Bradley Franco, University of Portland

Shaina Lynch, Boise State University, undergraduate student
“The No-Color of Women: Women and Commemoration in the Treasure Valley of Idaho”

Liza J. Schade, Portland State University, graduate student
“Finding a Community Niche: Rethinking Historic House Museums in Oregon”

Emma Williams, University of Idaho, undergraduate student
“Portraiture, Patriotism, and Politicking: The Political Effect of Visual Histories”

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35242

Included in

History Commons

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Apr 9th, 9:00 AM Apr 9th, 10:15 AM

Portraiture, Patriotism, and Politicking: The Political Effect of Visual Histories

The use of iconography to remember and honor military and political heroes has been in place since cave paintings. John Singleton Copley, Emanuel Leutze, Gilbert Stuart, and John Trumbull all used their talents to honor many of American Founding Fathers. Honored during and after their time, their work gives us a better understanding of what was valued and how these men were identified. The use of material culture allows for more portraiture, and the use of displaying socioeconomic standing. Copley, Leutze, Stuart, and Trumbull all had works used in political propaganda, and manipulation for years after. The images on today’s currency can trace their origin back to portraits completed by Copley. The way a person is arranged in a portrait, what they wear, what the background displays all show the artist is attempting to honor them. Whether it was one person or 50, an image from the Revolutionary era helps to solidify how the war was viewed by the artists.

PART OF SESSION 1C. PUBLIC COMMEMORATION:

Comment: Larry Cebula, Eastern Washington University
Chair: Bradley Franco, University of Portland

Shaina Lynch, Boise State University, undergraduate student
“The No-Color of Women: Women and Commemoration in the Treasure Valley of Idaho”

Liza J. Schade, Portland State University, graduate student
“Finding a Community Niche: Rethinking Historic House Museums in Oregon”

Emma Williams, University of Idaho, undergraduate student
“Portraiture, Patriotism, and Politicking: The Political Effect of Visual Histories”