Start Date

9-4-2021 3:15 PM

End Date

9-4-2021 4:50 PM

Disciplines

History

Subjects

Famines -- Ukraine -- Chernihivsʹka oblastʹ -- History, Ukraine -- History -- Famine (1932-1933) -- Political aspects, Genocide -- Ukraine -- History, Political atrocities -- Ukraine -- History

Description

Abstract: The choices made by political leaders do not merely affect those that hold office, rather there is a trickle-down effect that touches every life within their nation. The event known as the Holodomor was a Ukrainian famine during the 1930s. Stalin’s decisions were based upon impressions created during the Russian famine in the 1920s under Lenin’s leadership. Previous research supports the widely agreed upon determination that the famine was not a side effect of natural causes, but rather the direct result of Stalin’s collectivism. Furthermore, the U.N. declared the event to be genocide and not due to poorly directed actions made by idealistic leaders, but deliberate actions taken as a result of a political power struggle which resulted in the deaths of millions. This paper investigates the trickle-down effects of choices made by political leaders throughout the famine. I have identified tales of survivors, such as that of Aleksandra Mikhailovna Safronova Graybeal, in which we see the indirect costs of economic choices and political schemes upon those with no political connections. My exploration of the survivor’s tales indicates that those with no political power are hit the hardest as the actions of political machinations take effect over those they govern.

PART OF SESSION 4C. SICKNESS AND DEATH

Comment: Tom Taylor, Seattle University
Chair: Alyson Roy, University of Idaho

Ben Hecko, University of Portland, undergraduate student
“Plague and Progress: An Analysis of Giovanni Boccaccio’s Decameron and Reform during the Initial Outbreak of the Black Death”

Anika Esther Martin, Eastern Washington University, undergraduate student
“The ‘English Bath’: English Sweating Sickness and the 1529 Continental Outbreak”

Patricia A. McManigal, Boise State University, undergraduate student
“The Holodomor: The Trickle-Down effect of Political and Economic Choices”

Brian O’Riley, Eastern Washington University, graduate student
“The Klondike Gold Rush and the Dead Horse Trail”

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Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35245

Included in

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Apr 9th, 3:15 PM Apr 9th, 4:50 PM

The Holodomor: The Trickle-Down effect of Political and Economic Choices

Abstract: The choices made by political leaders do not merely affect those that hold office, rather there is a trickle-down effect that touches every life within their nation. The event known as the Holodomor was a Ukrainian famine during the 1930s. Stalin’s decisions were based upon impressions created during the Russian famine in the 1920s under Lenin’s leadership. Previous research supports the widely agreed upon determination that the famine was not a side effect of natural causes, but rather the direct result of Stalin’s collectivism. Furthermore, the U.N. declared the event to be genocide and not due to poorly directed actions made by idealistic leaders, but deliberate actions taken as a result of a political power struggle which resulted in the deaths of millions. This paper investigates the trickle-down effects of choices made by political leaders throughout the famine. I have identified tales of survivors, such as that of Aleksandra Mikhailovna Safronova Graybeal, in which we see the indirect costs of economic choices and political schemes upon those with no political connections. My exploration of the survivor’s tales indicates that those with no political power are hit the hardest as the actions of political machinations take effect over those they govern.

PART OF SESSION 4C. SICKNESS AND DEATH

Comment: Tom Taylor, Seattle University
Chair: Alyson Roy, University of Idaho

Ben Hecko, University of Portland, undergraduate student
“Plague and Progress: An Analysis of Giovanni Boccaccio’s Decameron and Reform during the Initial Outbreak of the Black Death”

Anika Esther Martin, Eastern Washington University, undergraduate student
“The ‘English Bath’: English Sweating Sickness and the 1529 Continental Outbreak”

Patricia A. McManigal, Boise State University, undergraduate student
“The Holodomor: The Trickle-Down effect of Political and Economic Choices”

Brian O’Riley, Eastern Washington University, graduate student
“The Klondike Gold Rush and the Dead Horse Trail”