Start Date

9-4-2021 1:30 PM

End Date

9-4-2021 2:45 PM

Disciplines

History | Social Justice

Subjects

Notting Hill Riots (London England : 1958), Nottingham (England) -- Race relations -- History -- 20th century, Racism -- Great Britain -- History -- 20th century, Blacks -- England -- Social conditions

Description

Late into August 1958, a gang of white youth unleashed a catastrophic wave of targeted violence against Black migrants in the areas around Notting Hill and Nottingham. The event came to be known as the Notting Hill and Nottingham riots. The riots served as a watershed moment, allowing government members to capitalize on race as a problem and eventually limit Black entry into the country and validate unequal access to opportunities and support. However, the riots merely served as kindling to a destructive discourse of race relations already taking place, constructing a narrative that saw Black individuals as foreign, dangerous, agents of destruction that brought destabilization and incivility. The Riots in Nottingham and Notting Hill are a story of how racial discrimination, political isolation, and a preoccupation with preconceived inappropriate interracial sexual interactions created instances of mass violence conditions. This study seeks to link the newly formed scientific discourse within the field of race relations that developed in Britain in the early postwar years and their connection, extension, and complacency of perpetuating colonial preoccupations of what Britain has considered appropriate sexual interactions, national membership, and race consciousness and the resulting violence used to maintain those ideals.

PART OF SESSION 3D. RACE AND DESEGREGATION:

Comment: Michael F. Conlin, Eastern Washington University
Chair: Jeanette Fregulia, Carroll College

Victor Curiel, Idaho State University, graduate student
“The Sun Only Sets on Black Britons: Sexuality and the Notting Hill Riots”

Jared Kimball, Brigham Young University-Idaho, undergraduate student
"World War II and Racial Relations"

Gerrit Sterk, Western Washington University, undergraduate student
"Elmore v. Rice et al.: The Court Case that Defies a Narrative"

Rights

Creative Commons License

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Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35250

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Apr 9th, 1:30 PM Apr 9th, 2:45 PM

The Sun Only Sets on Black Britons: Sexuality and the Notting Hill Riots

Late into August 1958, a gang of white youth unleashed a catastrophic wave of targeted violence against Black migrants in the areas around Notting Hill and Nottingham. The event came to be known as the Notting Hill and Nottingham riots. The riots served as a watershed moment, allowing government members to capitalize on race as a problem and eventually limit Black entry into the country and validate unequal access to opportunities and support. However, the riots merely served as kindling to a destructive discourse of race relations already taking place, constructing a narrative that saw Black individuals as foreign, dangerous, agents of destruction that brought destabilization and incivility. The Riots in Nottingham and Notting Hill are a story of how racial discrimination, political isolation, and a preoccupation with preconceived inappropriate interracial sexual interactions created instances of mass violence conditions. This study seeks to link the newly formed scientific discourse within the field of race relations that developed in Britain in the early postwar years and their connection, extension, and complacency of perpetuating colonial preoccupations of what Britain has considered appropriate sexual interactions, national membership, and race consciousness and the resulting violence used to maintain those ideals.

PART OF SESSION 3D. RACE AND DESEGREGATION:

Comment: Michael F. Conlin, Eastern Washington University
Chair: Jeanette Fregulia, Carroll College

Victor Curiel, Idaho State University, graduate student
“The Sun Only Sets on Black Britons: Sexuality and the Notting Hill Riots”

Jared Kimball, Brigham Young University-Idaho, undergraduate student
"World War II and Racial Relations"

Gerrit Sterk, Western Washington University, undergraduate student
"Elmore v. Rice et al.: The Court Case that Defies a Narrative"