Presenter Information

Hana Cooper, Seattle University

Start Date

10-4-2021 10:45 AM

End Date

10-4-2021 12:00 PM

Disciplines

History

Subjects

Inter-allied Commission on Mandates in Turkey. American Section, World War (1914-1918) -- Territorial questions -- Middle East, Mandates -- Middle East, Middle East -- Foreign relations -- United States -- History, United States -- Foreign relations -- Middle East -- History

Description

Abstract: My paper focuses on the King-Crane Commission, a group sent to the Middle East from the United States by Woodrow Wilson after the end of World War I. These men surveyed the population of the Ottoman Empire regarding their post-imperial land and political objectives, compiling their responses into a report known as the King-Crane Report; unfortunately, however, the report was suppressed upon the Commission’s return to the United States, not being published or even acknowledged by Wilson until after the mandate system had already been established in former Ottoman territory. While my larger thesis project argues that the entire process of giving Ottoman subjects hope only to suppress their voices was a major betrayal on the part of the U.S., this paper examines some of the shortcomings in the report itself, namely how the voices of major groups in the region were excluded from it. The Commission failed to incorporate women, Iraqis, and other groups in their findings or recommendations, a fact which exposes critical flaws in their methodology. These omissions call into question not only the failure of the Commission to achieve results, but how much good their recommendations might have done, had the report not been suppressed.

PART OF SESSION 6C. THE STATUS OF WOMEN:

Comment: Ellen Kittell, University of Idaho
Chair: Theresa Earenfight, Seattle University

Hana Cooper, Seattle University, undergraduate student
“The Voices Left Out: Women and the King-Crane Commission”

Tyler Holman, Idaho State University, undergraduate student
“Women in Burmese Society: The Traditional High Status of Burmese Women and the Aftermath of Colonization”

Hannah A. Reynolds, Portland State University, graduate student
"'I just had to do most everything': Colonial Implications of Settler Women’s Roles in Nineteenth-Century Oregon"

Rights

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35288

Included in

History Commons

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Apr 10th, 10:45 AM Apr 10th, 12:00 PM

The Voices Left Out: Women and the King-Crane Commission

Abstract: My paper focuses on the King-Crane Commission, a group sent to the Middle East from the United States by Woodrow Wilson after the end of World War I. These men surveyed the population of the Ottoman Empire regarding their post-imperial land and political objectives, compiling their responses into a report known as the King-Crane Report; unfortunately, however, the report was suppressed upon the Commission’s return to the United States, not being published or even acknowledged by Wilson until after the mandate system had already been established in former Ottoman territory. While my larger thesis project argues that the entire process of giving Ottoman subjects hope only to suppress their voices was a major betrayal on the part of the U.S., this paper examines some of the shortcomings in the report itself, namely how the voices of major groups in the region were excluded from it. The Commission failed to incorporate women, Iraqis, and other groups in their findings or recommendations, a fact which exposes critical flaws in their methodology. These omissions call into question not only the failure of the Commission to achieve results, but how much good their recommendations might have done, had the report not been suppressed.

PART OF SESSION 6C. THE STATUS OF WOMEN:

Comment: Ellen Kittell, University of Idaho
Chair: Theresa Earenfight, Seattle University

Hana Cooper, Seattle University, undergraduate student
“The Voices Left Out: Women and the King-Crane Commission”

Tyler Holman, Idaho State University, undergraduate student
“Women in Burmese Society: The Traditional High Status of Burmese Women and the Aftermath of Colonization”

Hannah A. Reynolds, Portland State University, graduate student
"'I just had to do most everything': Colonial Implications of Settler Women’s Roles in Nineteenth-Century Oregon"