Title of Presentation

Zoonotic Illness among Veterinarians & the TWH perspective

Presenter Biography

Nicole Chaudhary is a second year MPH student in the Environmental Systems and Human Health track. I have a Bachelor’s degree in Biology from the University of Wisconsin, Whitewater. Additionally, I have 6 years of experience in the healthcare field and am currently employed at an infectious disease center in Salem, Oregon.

Institution

OHSU

Program/Major

MPH- Environmental Systems and Human Health

Degree

MPH

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

7-4-2020 2:34 PM

End Date

7-4-2020 2:39 PM

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/33758

Keywords

Zoonoses, Zoonotic, veterinary, public health, disease prevention, Total worker health

Abstract

People in the field of veterinary science are exposed to a unique set of occupational hazards, namely zoonotic diseases, or pathogens that can be passed between humans and animals. People who work in the field of veterinary science are frequently working at the human-animal interface and can be exposed to a variety of zoonotic bacteria, viruses, or parasites that may crossover from their animal clients. This poses a serious occupational hazard for people who work in the field of veterinary science due to constant exposure to animals. Currently, there approximately 70,000 veterinarians working in the field in the United States today. Not only are veterinarians subject to zoonotic infections, but their clients and communities are too. Zoonotic illness can be hazardous, but currently zoonotic diseases are becoming more dangerous. Antibiotic resistant strains are also starting to cross over from the animal realm to humans. Preventing zoonotic crossover can also slow the rate of antibiotic resistance in humans and animals by preventing illnesses that require the use of antibiotics. Preventing zoonotic disease keeps veterinarians, their clients, animals, and communities healthy in a time of antibiotic resistance. A systemic review of the literature on the Web of Science will be conducted to review the literature on the topic. Major themes in the literature include nosocomial infections, antibiotic resistance, exposure assessments, and intervention work. A discussion on Total Worker Health interventions will follow.

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Apr 7th, 2:34 PM Apr 7th, 2:39 PM

Zoonotic Illness among Veterinarians & the TWH perspective

People in the field of veterinary science are exposed to a unique set of occupational hazards, namely zoonotic diseases, or pathogens that can be passed between humans and animals. People who work in the field of veterinary science are frequently working at the human-animal interface and can be exposed to a variety of zoonotic bacteria, viruses, or parasites that may crossover from their animal clients. This poses a serious occupational hazard for people who work in the field of veterinary science due to constant exposure to animals. Currently, there approximately 70,000 veterinarians working in the field in the United States today. Not only are veterinarians subject to zoonotic infections, but their clients and communities are too. Zoonotic illness can be hazardous, but currently zoonotic diseases are becoming more dangerous. Antibiotic resistant strains are also starting to cross over from the animal realm to humans. Preventing zoonotic crossover can also slow the rate of antibiotic resistance in humans and animals by preventing illnesses that require the use of antibiotics. Preventing zoonotic disease keeps veterinarians, their clients, animals, and communities healthy in a time of antibiotic resistance. A systemic review of the literature on the Web of Science will be conducted to review the literature on the topic. Major themes in the literature include nosocomial infections, antibiotic resistance, exposure assessments, and intervention work. A discussion on Total Worker Health interventions will follow.