Title of Presentation

The Validity of the Hemocue 201 in Rural Tumbes, Peru: Implications for Anemia Screening and Evaluation of Interventions

Presenter Biography

I am a PhD candidate in the Epidemiology program at the joint Oregon Health Sciences University and Portland State University School of Public Health (OHSU-PSU SPH). My primary research interests are community-based epidemiological studies with a focus on the identification of social and environmental sources of adverse health outcomes and validation of methods to increase participation in culturally acceptable control efforts among vulnerable populations. I have worked extensively on T. solium screening and community-based control development for over five years starting as a research coordinator with Johns Hopkins, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, and Peace Corps Peru, and more recently as a research assistant during my PhD training at OHSU-PSU School of Public Health in collaboration with the Center of Global Health Tumbes, Peru. Fieldwork conducted during my Fogarty will inform my dissertation that includes describing the distribution of anemia in Tumbes, Peru, quantifying the association of heavy metal exposure with anemia, and validating a novel non-invasive anemia screening tool. My long-term research focus is heavy metal exposure and chronic disease in under-served populations.

Institution

OHSU

Program/Major

Epidemiology

Degree

PhD

Presentation Type

Presentation

Start Date

8-4-2021 10:02 AM

End Date

8-4-2021 10:13 AM

Keywords

Anemia, Screening, Childhood Anemia, Peru, Validity

Abstract

Background: In spite of mass-nutritional interventions in northern Peru, anemia prevalence (~30%) has changed very little since 2010. Childhood anemia is a priority in the region and for this reason, the local government is collaborating with our research team to understand why interventions appear to have limited impact. One hypothesis is that the national standard anemia screening tool, Hemocue 201, provides invalid measures. We present results for the validity of the Hemocue 201 and describe ongoing research on alternative screening tools in this presentation.

Methods: To measure the validity of Hemocue201 in rural Tumbes Peru, we conducted a cross-sectional study in 264 children 6-59 months old in two rural districts. We recruited children during household visits and conducted venous blood draws for Hemocue 201 and semi-automated blood count tests. Guardians provided demographic information in a survey and received immediate results from the Hemocue 201.

Results: Fifty-seven(22%) of 264 children received a positive anemia screening from the Hemocue 201. Lab analysis for the semi-automated blood count is ongoing but to date 32 (18%) of 176 children have anemia. We will present final measures of Hemocue 201 validity using the semi-automated blood count as a gold standard at the conference.

Significance: It is critical we understand the validity of tools used for monitoring anemia prevalence to ensure the integrity of information used to evaluate regional anemia interventions. We will use results from our study to determine the need for alternative and practical screening tools in the region.

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Apr 8th, 10:02 AM Apr 8th, 10:13 AM

The Validity of the Hemocue 201 in Rural Tumbes, Peru: Implications for Anemia Screening and Evaluation of Interventions

Background: In spite of mass-nutritional interventions in northern Peru, anemia prevalence (~30%) has changed very little since 2010. Childhood anemia is a priority in the region and for this reason, the local government is collaborating with our research team to understand why interventions appear to have limited impact. One hypothesis is that the national standard anemia screening tool, Hemocue 201, provides invalid measures. We present results for the validity of the Hemocue 201 and describe ongoing research on alternative screening tools in this presentation.

Methods: To measure the validity of Hemocue201 in rural Tumbes Peru, we conducted a cross-sectional study in 264 children 6-59 months old in two rural districts. We recruited children during household visits and conducted venous blood draws for Hemocue 201 and semi-automated blood count tests. Guardians provided demographic information in a survey and received immediate results from the Hemocue 201.

Results: Fifty-seven(22%) of 264 children received a positive anemia screening from the Hemocue 201. Lab analysis for the semi-automated blood count is ongoing but to date 32 (18%) of 176 children have anemia. We will present final measures of Hemocue 201 validity using the semi-automated blood count as a gold standard at the conference.

Significance: It is critical we understand the validity of tools used for monitoring anemia prevalence to ensure the integrity of information used to evaluate regional anemia interventions. We will use results from our study to determine the need for alternative and practical screening tools in the region.