Title of Presentation

Gender differences in response to a paid parental leave policy: A sequence analysis of administrative time-keeping records

Presenter Biography

Lisset Dumet is a Health Systems and Policy Ph.D. student at OHSU-PSU School of Public Health. Currently, Lisset works as a graduate researcher with Dr. Seth O'Neal on the implementation of an evidence-based intervention to control parasite transmission and reduce neurological diseases in Peru. Lisset is interested in studying the health systems' role in facilitating or preventing the implementation of health programs that require high level of multisectoral coordination and collaboration in low-resource settings.

Institution

OHSU

Program/Major

Health Systems and Policy

Degree

PhD

Presentation Type

Presentation

Start Date

8-4-2021 10:26 AM

End Date

8-4-2021 10:37 AM

Abstract

The US lacks a national paid family leave policy, leaving workers to navigate their employee benefits systems to piece together parental leave. As both governmental and organizational paid leave policies expand across the US, the extent to which these policies reach workers and differentially affect their leave-taking trajectories remains underexplored. We use sequence and cluster analyses of administrative time-keeping records to detail parental leave-taking among employees of a large public-sector organization with a new paid parental leave policy. New parents varied in leave-taking arrangements, with distinct trajectories for women and men, who also responded differentially to the new paid parental leave policy. The additional paid leave benefits replaced some of women’s unpaid leave, but also lengthened their total leave duration; for men, who were already only taking paid leave, the additional benefits replaced sick leave use but left total leave duration unaffected.

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Apr 8th, 10:26 AM Apr 8th, 10:37 AM

Gender differences in response to a paid parental leave policy: A sequence analysis of administrative time-keeping records

The US lacks a national paid family leave policy, leaving workers to navigate their employee benefits systems to piece together parental leave. As both governmental and organizational paid leave policies expand across the US, the extent to which these policies reach workers and differentially affect their leave-taking trajectories remains underexplored. We use sequence and cluster analyses of administrative time-keeping records to detail parental leave-taking among employees of a large public-sector organization with a new paid parental leave policy. New parents varied in leave-taking arrangements, with distinct trajectories for women and men, who also responded differentially to the new paid parental leave policy. The additional paid leave benefits replaced some of women’s unpaid leave, but also lengthened their total leave duration; for men, who were already only taking paid leave, the additional benefits replaced sick leave use but left total leave duration unaffected.