Title of Presentation

Perspectives on Medical Bias and Health Inequity Training Among BIPOC Health Professionals

Presenter Biography

Claire Dunlap, Priyanka Gautom, Sydney Ito, and Bradie Winders are graduate students at the OHSU-PSU School of Public Health. Among their individual public health interests, these presenters share the common desire to bring awareness to the challenges and disparities that BIPOC communities face with their research training and further assist in the effort to dismantle systemic racism and discrimination.

Institution

OHSU

Program/Major

Epidemiology, Community Health

Degree

MPH, PhD

Presentation Type

Presentation

Start Date

6-4-2022 2:33 PM

End Date

6-4-2022 2:44 PM

Abstract

Background: Implicit bias and discrimination from healthcare professionals is a driving factor in determining the quality of healthcare that Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) communities receive. There is evidence that medical training programs reinforce implicit bias and systemic racism by perpetuating the narrative that race is a biological construct. BIPOC healthcare professionals face systemic racism in everyday life and are also more likely to be discriminated against in educational institutions, the workplace, and as patients.

Objective: Gather the perspectives of early career BIPOC health professionals regarding their experiences of medical bias and health inequity education/training within their respective health professions.

Methods: This qualitative study used semi-structured interviews with purposively sampled participants who self-identified as early career BIPOC healthcare professionals from various programs across the United States. The interviews were conducted virtually through Zoom. Thematic analysis was used to identify key themes.

Results: Eight participants aged 25 to 33 years were recruited and self-identified as Punjabi, African, African American, Hispanic, Mexican, Non-Hispanic or Latino, and Vietnamese. An overall consensus of inadequacy was reported for training and education at both the institution and workforce levels. Common challenges reported at the institution level included promotion of bias, dissatisfaction with protection from bias (worker and patient), and lack of cultural and racial/ethnic diversity within student cohorts.

Conclusions: Early career BIPOC healthcare professionals reported inadequate education and training on medical bias and health inequities. These results may be instrumental in reforming education and training for all healthcare professionals.

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Apr 6th, 2:33 PM Apr 6th, 2:44 PM

Perspectives on Medical Bias and Health Inequity Training Among BIPOC Health Professionals

Background: Implicit bias and discrimination from healthcare professionals is a driving factor in determining the quality of healthcare that Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) communities receive. There is evidence that medical training programs reinforce implicit bias and systemic racism by perpetuating the narrative that race is a biological construct. BIPOC healthcare professionals face systemic racism in everyday life and are also more likely to be discriminated against in educational institutions, the workplace, and as patients.

Objective: Gather the perspectives of early career BIPOC health professionals regarding their experiences of medical bias and health inequity education/training within their respective health professions.

Methods: This qualitative study used semi-structured interviews with purposively sampled participants who self-identified as early career BIPOC healthcare professionals from various programs across the United States. The interviews were conducted virtually through Zoom. Thematic analysis was used to identify key themes.

Results: Eight participants aged 25 to 33 years were recruited and self-identified as Punjabi, African, African American, Hispanic, Mexican, Non-Hispanic or Latino, and Vietnamese. An overall consensus of inadequacy was reported for training and education at both the institution and workforce levels. Common challenges reported at the institution level included promotion of bias, dissatisfaction with protection from bias (worker and patient), and lack of cultural and racial/ethnic diversity within student cohorts.

Conclusions: Early career BIPOC healthcare professionals reported inadequate education and training on medical bias and health inequities. These results may be instrumental in reforming education and training for all healthcare professionals.