Published In

Journal of Hate Studies

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

9-2010

Subjects

Hate crimes, White supremacy movements, Race discrimination -- United States

Abstract

Increasingly, scholars are acknowledging that racial and other forms of animus assume a spatial dimension. Not only does intercultural hostility take different forms depending on location, but so, too, does the concomitant bias-motivated violence imply “places for races.” The very intent and motive of hate crimes are grounded in the perceived need of perpetrators to defend carefully crafted boundaries. While these boundaries are largely cultural, they may also take on a real, physical form, at least from the perpetrator’s perspective. Nowhere is this more evident than in the geographical imagination of the White Supremacist movement. This paper will trace the ways in which the movement idealizes the appropriate geographical “places for races.”

Description

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

DOI

10.33972/jhs.67

Locate the Document

https://doi.org/10.33972/jhs.67

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/33578

Share

COinS