Publication Title

Annals of Behavioral Medicine

Document Type

Post-Print

Publication Date

2-2014

Subjects

HIV infections -- Uganda -- Social aspects, HIV infections -- Uganda -- Treatment, AIDS (Disease) -- Uganda -- SOcial aspects

Physical Description

21 pages

Abstract

Background—Cross-sectional studies show that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) stigma is negatively correlated with social support.

Purpose—The purpose of this study is to examine the bidirectional relationship between social support and HIV stigma.

Methods—We collected quarterly data from a cohort of 422 people living with HIV in Uganda, followed for a median of 2.1 years. We used multilevel regression to model the contemporaneous and 3-month-lagged associations between social support and both enacted and internalized stigma.

Results—Lagged enacted stigma was negatively correlated with emotional and instrumental social support, and lagged instrumental social support was negatively correlated with enacted stigma. Internalized stigma and emotional social support had reciprocal lagged associations.

Conclusions—Interventions to reduce enacted stigma may strengthen social support for people living with HIV. Improved social support may in turn have a protective influence against future enacted and internalized stigma.

Description

Author's version of an article that subsequently appeared in Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 2014 August; 48(1): 26-37. © Springer Verlag

DOI

10.1007/s12160-013-9576-5

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/18613

Publisher

Springer

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