Location

Portland State University

Start Date

2-5-2018 11:00 AM

End Date

2-5-2018 1:00 PM

Subjects

Kinematics, Physics--Methodology

Abstract

Traditional introductory physics kinematics laboratories utilized a few different instruments for locating objects in motion, all of which have shortcomings. Some provide only timing data, which heavily restricts trajectories and data collection. Some instruments provide more measurements but restrict object shapes, orientations, and textures. Still others require extensive pre-processing. None of these traditional instruments provide two- or three-dimensional position data. New, low-cost, local positioning technology, based on radio frequency wireless communications, is available that enables novel redesigns of physics laboratories. This technology provides two- and three-dimensional position measurements, continuously, at data rates of 10 Hz or faster, from any object to which it can be affixed. Our research group at Portland State University is exploring how this technology can be applied to reconstruct and improve introductory laboratories, making them easier to perform while increasing the amount of usable data gathered. Additionally, we seek to enhance model-based learning experience in labs by confronting students with more diverse models than traditionally encountered. For example, we are pursuing applications in free-fall experiments, aerodynamic friction, two-dimensional motion, two-dimensional collisions, tug-of-war competitions, as well as Astronomy applications such as retrograde motion.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/25061

Included in

Physics Commons

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May 2nd, 11:00 AM May 2nd, 1:00 PM

Opportunities in Physics Education: Low-Cost Position Tracking for Use in Kinematics Labs

Portland State University

Traditional introductory physics kinematics laboratories utilized a few different instruments for locating objects in motion, all of which have shortcomings. Some provide only timing data, which heavily restricts trajectories and data collection. Some instruments provide more measurements but restrict object shapes, orientations, and textures. Still others require extensive pre-processing. None of these traditional instruments provide two- or three-dimensional position data. New, low-cost, local positioning technology, based on radio frequency wireless communications, is available that enables novel redesigns of physics laboratories. This technology provides two- and three-dimensional position measurements, continuously, at data rates of 10 Hz or faster, from any object to which it can be affixed. Our research group at Portland State University is exploring how this technology can be applied to reconstruct and improve introductory laboratories, making them easier to perform while increasing the amount of usable data gathered. Additionally, we seek to enhance model-based learning experience in labs by confronting students with more diverse models than traditionally encountered. For example, we are pursuing applications in free-fall experiments, aerodynamic friction, two-dimensional motion, two-dimensional collisions, tug-of-war competitions, as well as Astronomy applications such as retrograde motion.