Location

Portland State University

Start Date

7-5-2019 11:00 AM

End Date

7-5-2019 1:00 PM

Subjects

Feminist sociology, Ethnology -- Authorship, Shame -- Social aspects, Intersectionality (Sociology), Gender-nonconforming people

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to investigate the ways an individual resists dehumanization and/or disempowerment in the face of marginalizing societal forces, and it theorizes about the relationship among vulnerability, shame, and resiliency for women and queer-identified persons resisting dehumanization/disempowerment. Using autoethnography and other qualitative research methods (i.e., surveys and interviews), the author explores the lived experiences of shame and vulnerability in herself and others. The author applies resiliency theory and an intersectional lens to illuminate vulnerability, shame, and the ways they play themselves out in individual lives and in institutional systems. The author offers the reader insights for how individuals might positively address shame in their own lives and how doing so creates possibilities for future thriving. Shame gives rise to a wide array of disorders, including depression, addictions, and eating and sexual disorders, as well as emotional problems linked to trauma, gender, race, illness, old age, infertility, and gender. In our society, shame manifests itself through alienation, lack of motivation, and feelings of meaninglessness. While guilty people feel they have done something bad or wrong, shame-filled people feel that who they are is bad and wrong. Not only does shame trigger depression, but it can also cause domestic violence along with self-esteem issues. Finding out if clients suffer from depression, anxiety other mental illness is beneficial in finding out how those cognitive deficits are looked at in order to seek help and seek recovery This population of people has undergone tremendous obstacles in their lives and by using a resilience theoretical lens and a qualitative personage to demonstrate the similarities and differences in how shame affects this group of people.

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/28659

Included in

Sociology Commons

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May 7th, 11:00 AM May 7th, 1:00 PM

A Society That Can Heal: An Autoethnography of a Feminist Framework About Shame and How We Can Recover. A Women’s and Queer Identified Outlook to Social Emotion

Portland State University

The purpose of this study is to investigate the ways an individual resists dehumanization and/or disempowerment in the face of marginalizing societal forces, and it theorizes about the relationship among vulnerability, shame, and resiliency for women and queer-identified persons resisting dehumanization/disempowerment. Using autoethnography and other qualitative research methods (i.e., surveys and interviews), the author explores the lived experiences of shame and vulnerability in herself and others. The author applies resiliency theory and an intersectional lens to illuminate vulnerability, shame, and the ways they play themselves out in individual lives and in institutional systems. The author offers the reader insights for how individuals might positively address shame in their own lives and how doing so creates possibilities for future thriving. Shame gives rise to a wide array of disorders, including depression, addictions, and eating and sexual disorders, as well as emotional problems linked to trauma, gender, race, illness, old age, infertility, and gender. In our society, shame manifests itself through alienation, lack of motivation, and feelings of meaninglessness. While guilty people feel they have done something bad or wrong, shame-filled people feel that who they are is bad and wrong. Not only does shame trigger depression, but it can also cause domestic violence along with self-esteem issues. Finding out if clients suffer from depression, anxiety other mental illness is beneficial in finding out how those cognitive deficits are looked at in order to seek help and seek recovery This population of people has undergone tremendous obstacles in their lives and by using a resilience theoretical lens and a qualitative personage to demonstrate the similarities and differences in how shame affects this group of people.