Location

Portland State University

Start Date

7-5-2019 11:00 AM

End Date

7-5-2019 1:00 PM

Subjects

Bilingualism, Language and languages -- Study and teaching, Language attrition, Tone (Phonetics)

Abstract

Previous research has shown that English dominance caused an attrition effect in tone processing in native Mandarin speakers (Quam & Creel, 2017). There were two explanations offered, either tones are more prone to attrition because of their unique mental representation, or English dominant bilinguals are able to recruit English perceptual categories to process the Mandarin vowels. This research project is a verification and expansion of that research investigating how dominance in English, a non-tonal language, impacts lexical tonal processing in Mandarin for Mandarin-English bilinguals. This research project is testing the robustness of this effect in two ways. The first is a replication study (Experiment 1). The second test is a new experimental paradigm (Experiment 2) testing the two hypotheses by investigating whether vowels unique to Mandarin also show attrition effects. Language dominance for participants is determined via the MultiLingual Naming Test (Gollan, Weissberger, Runnqvist, Montoya, & Cera, 2012), the Bilingual Dominance Survey of Dunn & Fox Tree (2009), and Age of Arrival in an English-speaking country. Experiment 1 confirmed and almost perfectly replicated the original research. Preliminary data analysis for Experiment 2 indicates that English dominance is linked to slower tone identification. However, data from the first 20 (Mandarin dominant) participants replicate data patterns of the original study and Experiment 1. Once English dominant participants have been recruited and tested, further analysis will be able to confirm or refute the predictions of the original research.

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/28682

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May 7th, 11:00 AM May 7th, 1:00 PM

Attrition Effects in Mandarin-English Bilinguals of Varying Proficiency

Portland State University

Previous research has shown that English dominance caused an attrition effect in tone processing in native Mandarin speakers (Quam & Creel, 2017). There were two explanations offered, either tones are more prone to attrition because of their unique mental representation, or English dominant bilinguals are able to recruit English perceptual categories to process the Mandarin vowels. This research project is a verification and expansion of that research investigating how dominance in English, a non-tonal language, impacts lexical tonal processing in Mandarin for Mandarin-English bilinguals. This research project is testing the robustness of this effect in two ways. The first is a replication study (Experiment 1). The second test is a new experimental paradigm (Experiment 2) testing the two hypotheses by investigating whether vowels unique to Mandarin also show attrition effects. Language dominance for participants is determined via the MultiLingual Naming Test (Gollan, Weissberger, Runnqvist, Montoya, & Cera, 2012), the Bilingual Dominance Survey of Dunn & Fox Tree (2009), and Age of Arrival in an English-speaking country. Experiment 1 confirmed and almost perfectly replicated the original research. Preliminary data analysis for Experiment 2 indicates that English dominance is linked to slower tone identification. However, data from the first 20 (Mandarin dominant) participants replicate data patterns of the original study and Experiment 1. Once English dominant participants have been recruited and tested, further analysis will be able to confirm or refute the predictions of the original research.