Location

Portland State University

Start Date

7-5-2019 1:30 PM

End Date

7-5-2019 3:00 PM

Subjects

Ingestion disorders in children, Cleft lip -- Treatment, Cleft palate children -- Treatment, Evidence-based medicine

Abstract

Feeding disorders in children with craniofacial anomalies, specifically cleft lip and/or palate, have been documented in the literature as a source of parental stress and can lead to difficulties with the early parent-infant bonding process, as well other medical co-morbidities including poor growth, impairment to the respiratory and developmental health of the child, and increased hospitalizations (Miller, 2011). However, there is a dearth of information in the literature regarding atypical craniofacial anomalies and early feeding difficulties. By utilizing an interdisciplinary team approach, we present a series of three case studies of early feeding difficulties in children with varying degrees of atypical craniofacial anomalies. The case series aims to identify specific feeding outcomes to demonstrate the importance of early identification using a team-based approach to evaluation, treatment recommendations, and tracking clinical outcomes to provide a foundation of evidence-based medicine that can be utilized in future studies.

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/28600

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May 7th, 1:30 PM May 7th, 3:00 PM

Feeding Outcomes in Children with Craniofacial Anomalies

Portland State University

Feeding disorders in children with craniofacial anomalies, specifically cleft lip and/or palate, have been documented in the literature as a source of parental stress and can lead to difficulties with the early parent-infant bonding process, as well other medical co-morbidities including poor growth, impairment to the respiratory and developmental health of the child, and increased hospitalizations (Miller, 2011). However, there is a dearth of information in the literature regarding atypical craniofacial anomalies and early feeding difficulties. By utilizing an interdisciplinary team approach, we present a series of three case studies of early feeding difficulties in children with varying degrees of atypical craniofacial anomalies. The case series aims to identify specific feeding outcomes to demonstrate the importance of early identification using a team-based approach to evaluation, treatment recommendations, and tracking clinical outcomes to provide a foundation of evidence-based medicine that can be utilized in future studies.