Location

Portland State University

Start Date

7-5-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

7-5-2019 11:00 AM

Subjects

Disaster relief -- Government policy, Emergency management -- Appropriations and expenditures, Hurricane Sandy (2012) -- Effect on Appropriations and expenditures

Abstract

This study was conducted to discern if emergency management department appropriations in non-event municipalities increase after a major natural disaster. The literature written and research performed over the last decade suggested that a new emphasis on mitigation had resulted in increased collaboration and public support for disaster mitigation programmatically and financially. Conducting this research project entailed investigating if these non-event communities react by increasing their emergency management department (EMD) appropriations to prepare for future disasters. In exploring this question, it is important to convey how research has evolved on the subject of disaster funding, the importance of collaboration in disaster planning, and the economic fabric of federal, state, and local funding sources. The disaster selected as the intervention was Hurricane Sandy (referred to as Superstorm Sandy). Samples included large communities (greater than or equal to 50,000 residents) that maintain an EMD with a discernable and separate budget allocation within their governmental structure. This study examined the following hypotheses to answer the research question: H1: Communities do react to the catastrophic disaster by increasing appropriations to EMDs. H2: Location of the city and the Superstorm have an effect upon EMD budgets resulting in a statistically significant increase in EMD budgets before and after the Superstorm. The conclusion, achieved after conducting a Paired t-test and Two-Way (Factorial) ANOVA and applying the Bonferroni Correction, was that communities in the United States probably do not adjust EMD budgets to increase preparedness after a major catastrophe strikes another community. Discussion of the results and future research opportunities follow.

Keywords: disaster resilience, emergency management departments, disaster planning

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May 7th, 9:00 AM May 7th, 11:00 AM

Emergency Management Appropriations in Non-Event Municipalities

Portland State University

This study was conducted to discern if emergency management department appropriations in non-event municipalities increase after a major natural disaster. The literature written and research performed over the last decade suggested that a new emphasis on mitigation had resulted in increased collaboration and public support for disaster mitigation programmatically and financially. Conducting this research project entailed investigating if these non-event communities react by increasing their emergency management department (EMD) appropriations to prepare for future disasters. In exploring this question, it is important to convey how research has evolved on the subject of disaster funding, the importance of collaboration in disaster planning, and the economic fabric of federal, state, and local funding sources. The disaster selected as the intervention was Hurricane Sandy (referred to as Superstorm Sandy). Samples included large communities (greater than or equal to 50,000 residents) that maintain an EMD with a discernable and separate budget allocation within their governmental structure. This study examined the following hypotheses to answer the research question: H1: Communities do react to the catastrophic disaster by increasing appropriations to EMDs. H2: Location of the city and the Superstorm have an effect upon EMD budgets resulting in a statistically significant increase in EMD budgets before and after the Superstorm. The conclusion, achieved after conducting a Paired t-test and Two-Way (Factorial) ANOVA and applying the Bonferroni Correction, was that communities in the United States probably do not adjust EMD budgets to increase preparedness after a major catastrophe strikes another community. Discussion of the results and future research opportunities follow.

Keywords: disaster resilience, emergency management departments, disaster planning