Location

Portland State University

Start Date

7-5-2019 1:30 PM

End Date

7-5-2019 3:00 PM

Subjects

Star Wars: the last Jedi (Motion picture), Film trailers -- Effect on perceptions of motion pictures, Statistical analysis

Abstract

A literature review was conducted that found overwhelming evidence that movie trailers are physiologically stimulating to the viewer. An observational experiment was conducted that involved surveying a total of 204 subjects from randomly selected clusters. They were grouped into categories for further study. Of those 204, 102 had not seen Star Wars: the Last Jedi at the time of surveying. (Responses for movie satisfaction were not recorded from this group.) 31 of them had seen the movie but hadn't seen the trailer, 34 had seen the movie and saw the trailer by happenstance, and 37 had seen the movie and actively sought out the trailer. Confidence intervals were constructed that found a statistically significantly higher overall enjoyment rating for the group that had gone out of their way to see the trailer versus the other two groups that had seen the movie. The data shows a high correlation between people who had seen the trailer and higher satisfaction ratings of the movie. This may point to how much a trailer actually improves a viewer’s enjoyment of a movie.

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/28599

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May 7th, 1:30 PM May 7th, 3:00 PM

Are the Trailers the Real Star of Star Wars: the Last Jedi?

Portland State University

A literature review was conducted that found overwhelming evidence that movie trailers are physiologically stimulating to the viewer. An observational experiment was conducted that involved surveying a total of 204 subjects from randomly selected clusters. They were grouped into categories for further study. Of those 204, 102 had not seen Star Wars: the Last Jedi at the time of surveying. (Responses for movie satisfaction were not recorded from this group.) 31 of them had seen the movie but hadn't seen the trailer, 34 had seen the movie and saw the trailer by happenstance, and 37 had seen the movie and actively sought out the trailer. Confidence intervals were constructed that found a statistically significantly higher overall enjoyment rating for the group that had gone out of their way to see the trailer versus the other two groups that had seen the movie. The data shows a high correlation between people who had seen the trailer and higher satisfaction ratings of the movie. This may point to how much a trailer actually improves a viewer’s enjoyment of a movie.