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Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Subjects

Landslides -- Pacific Northwest, Mountain hydrology -- Remote sensing, Hydrology, Soil moisture

Department

Geology

Advisor

Adam Booth

Student Level

Undergraduate

Abstract

The Pacific Northwest experiences many landslides due to its climate. Remotely sensed data offers new ways to study how hydrologic variables such as precipitation, surface soil moisture (SSM), and pore-water pressure within a landslide behave and respond to changes in each other. The goal of this study is to find meaningful relationships between these variables such that in the future remotely sensed data alone will be able to provide meaningful insights for PNW landslide regions, which may lack on-site data monitoring. To examine these relationships at the Silt Creek Landslide in the western Oregon Cascades, a time-series graph for each variable was produced for precipitation and SSM over four water years, and over eight consecutive months for pore pressure. SSM data was remotely sensed via satellite, pore pressure data was collected through a borehole within the landslide, and precipitation data was downloaded from an on-site station. Analysis of the hydrological variables revealed a lag time of 1 day between precipitation initiation and SSM response and a lag time of 6-11 days for peak pore pressure responses. SSM was shown to follow a predictable growth pattern at the start of each wet season and then maintain a maximum value until the dry season. The relationship between pore pressure and SSM was found to be strongly correlated for drying periods. If the Silt Creek Landslide reactivates in the future, this remotely sensed hydrologic data will serve as a guide to predicting displacement timings for this study site based on pore pressure predictions.

Please provide feedback here:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdTDOpjdyRDsuOETPsZoSl1qmjM74kflvrGAJZo1F6WnDjOww/viewform?usp=sf_link

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35442

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Precipitation, Surface Soil Moisture, and Pore Pressure: Relationships and Response Times

The Pacific Northwest experiences many landslides due to its climate. Remotely sensed data offers new ways to study how hydrologic variables such as precipitation, surface soil moisture (SSM), and pore-water pressure within a landslide behave and respond to changes in each other. The goal of this study is to find meaningful relationships between these variables such that in the future remotely sensed data alone will be able to provide meaningful insights for PNW landslide regions, which may lack on-site data monitoring. To examine these relationships at the Silt Creek Landslide in the western Oregon Cascades, a time-series graph for each variable was produced for precipitation and SSM over four water years, and over eight consecutive months for pore pressure. SSM data was remotely sensed via satellite, pore pressure data was collected through a borehole within the landslide, and precipitation data was downloaded from an on-site station. Analysis of the hydrological variables revealed a lag time of 1 day between precipitation initiation and SSM response and a lag time of 6-11 days for peak pore pressure responses. SSM was shown to follow a predictable growth pattern at the start of each wet season and then maintain a maximum value until the dry season. The relationship between pore pressure and SSM was found to be strongly correlated for drying periods. If the Silt Creek Landslide reactivates in the future, this remotely sensed hydrologic data will serve as a guide to predicting displacement timings for this study site based on pore pressure predictions.

Please provide feedback here:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdTDOpjdyRDsuOETPsZoSl1qmjM74kflvrGAJZo1F6WnDjOww/viewform?usp=sf_link