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Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Subjects

Pediatric otolaryngology, Tracheotomy -- Patients -- Care, Trachea -- Surgery, Speech disorders in children

Department

Speech and Hearing Sciences

Advisor

Jana Childes, M.S., CCC-SLP; Deanna Britton, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, BC-ANCDS

Student Level

Masters

Abstract

Tracheostomy is an artificial airway that allows for the passage of air directly from the trachea to the lungs, bypassing the upper airway structures of typical respiration (Hull et al., 2005). This results in minimal airflow across the vocal folds and often inhibits the patient’s ability to vocalize. Children who require tracheostomy often remain tracheostomy-dependent throughout their first years of life, which is a crucial period for speech and language development (Watters, 2017). Research has shown that children with tracheostomy are at an increased risk for expressive and receptive language delay which may be due to a lack of auditory and oral-motor feedback typically accompanying speech development, lack of intensified language stimulation, and/or concomitant illnesses (Kaslon & Stein, 1985). However, the use of a tracheostomy speaking valve in an appropriate candidate may reduce the risk of speech and language delay by facilitating vocalization and providing a means to build verbal communication skills. This project provides a scoping review of the impact of tracheostomy on speech and language development and identifies intervention approaches aimed at facilitating communication with tracheostomy-dependent children using speaking valves.

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References

Hull, E. M., Dumas, H. M., Crowley, R. A., & Kharasch, V. S. (2005). Tracheostomy speaking valves for children: Tolerance and clinical benefits. Pediatric Rehabilitation, 8(3), 214-219. doi:10.1080/13638490400021503

Kaslon, K. W., & Stein, R. E. (1985). Chronic pediatric tracheotomy: Assessment and implications for habilitation of voice, speech and language in young children. International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, 9(2), 165-171. doi:10.1016/s0165-5876(85)80017-3

Watters, K. F. (2017). Tracheostomy in Infants and Children. Respiratory Care, 62(6). doi:10.4187/respcare.05366

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35445

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Impact of Pediatric Tracheostomy on Speech and Language Development, and Methods of Facilitating Communication

Tracheostomy is an artificial airway that allows for the passage of air directly from the trachea to the lungs, bypassing the upper airway structures of typical respiration (Hull et al., 2005). This results in minimal airflow across the vocal folds and often inhibits the patient’s ability to vocalize. Children who require tracheostomy often remain tracheostomy-dependent throughout their first years of life, which is a crucial period for speech and language development (Watters, 2017). Research has shown that children with tracheostomy are at an increased risk for expressive and receptive language delay which may be due to a lack of auditory and oral-motor feedback typically accompanying speech development, lack of intensified language stimulation, and/or concomitant illnesses (Kaslon & Stein, 1985). However, the use of a tracheostomy speaking valve in an appropriate candidate may reduce the risk of speech and language delay by facilitating vocalization and providing a means to build verbal communication skills. This project provides a scoping review of the impact of tracheostomy on speech and language development and identifies intervention approaches aimed at facilitating communication with tracheostomy-dependent children using speaking valves.

Please take a moment to provide feedback on my presentation by using this link.

References

Hull, E. M., Dumas, H. M., Crowley, R. A., & Kharasch, V. S. (2005). Tracheostomy speaking valves for children: Tolerance and clinical benefits. Pediatric Rehabilitation, 8(3), 214-219. doi:10.1080/13638490400021503

Kaslon, K. W., & Stein, R. E. (1985). Chronic pediatric tracheotomy: Assessment and implications for habilitation of voice, speech and language in young children. International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, 9(2), 165-171. doi:10.1016/s0165-5876(85)80017-3

Watters, K. F. (2017). Tracheostomy in Infants and Children. Respiratory Care, 62(6). doi:10.4187/respcare.05366