Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-5-2022 11:00 AM

End Date

4-5-2022 1:00 PM

Subjects

community engagement, language accessibility, activism, multimodalism

Advisor

Janet Cowal

Student Level

Undergraduate

Abstract

How are students of applied linguistics able to contribute to community efforts in increasing access to justice? Activist applied linguistics (AAL) (Cowal & Leung, 2021) is defined as utilizing applied linguistics in coordination with community partners to address wicked problems (Rittel & Webber, 1973). AAL provides a framework for engaging university students with communities outside of their campus and has been utilized to further work in water justice (Haeffner & Cowal, 2019) and to increase the Oregon State Bar website’s comprehensibility (Anesa, Cowal, & Pulju, 2022). In this poster, we present an AAL case study in which students of applied linguistics partner with the Oregon Judicial Department (OJD) for the purpose of increasing access to justice for Oregonians trying to navigate the Informal Domestic Relations Trial system. In conversation with OJD staff and building off of their OJD website, we employ multi-modal semiotic theory (Kress & van Leeuwen in Jovanovic, 2015), universal design (CAST, 2018) and plain language (Kimble, 2007) to create informational visuals that are more accessible to the public. Our poster gives examples of “befores” and “afters” of materials about Informal Domestic Relations Trials. We also present feedback from OJD and discuss the take-aways from this experience and provide suggestions for further research.

Anesa, P., Cowal J., & Pulju, K. (2022) Improving the accessibility of legal information online through community engagement. Digitalization and Institutionalization of Legal Knowledge. Luttermann, K., Engberg, J., Münster et al. LIT Verlag

CAST (2018). Universal Design for Learning Guidelines version 2.2. Retrieved from http://udlguidelines.cast.org

Cowal, J., & Leung, G. (2021). Activist applied linguistics. In S. Conrad, A.J. Hartig, & L. Santelmann (Eds.). The Cambridge introduction to applied linguistics (pp. 308-324). Cambridge University Press.

Haeffner, M., & Cowal, J. (2019). A case study of OregonWaterStories.com: Exploring agency with water justice, activist applied linguistics, and a community partner. Case Studies in the Environment, 3. https://doi.org/10.1525/cse.2018.001685

Jovanovic, Danica. 2015. “Important people in multimodality theory.” In Key Terms in Multimodality: Definitions, Issues, Discussions, edited by Nina Nørgaard. www.sdu.dk/multimodalkeyterms. Retrieved 03/05/2022

Kimble, J. (2007). "Lifting the fog of legalese : essays on plain language". Thomas M. Cooley Law School.

Rittel, W., & Webber, M. (1973). Dilemmas in a general theory

of planning. Policy Science. (pp. 155–169). doi:10.1007/bf01405730.

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/37505

Share

COinS
 
May 4th, 11:00 AM May 4th, 1:00 PM

Case Study in Activist Applied Linguistics: Working with the Oregon Judicial Department for the Accessibility of Domestic Relations Information

How are students of applied linguistics able to contribute to community efforts in increasing access to justice? Activist applied linguistics (AAL) (Cowal & Leung, 2021) is defined as utilizing applied linguistics in coordination with community partners to address wicked problems (Rittel & Webber, 1973). AAL provides a framework for engaging university students with communities outside of their campus and has been utilized to further work in water justice (Haeffner & Cowal, 2019) and to increase the Oregon State Bar website’s comprehensibility (Anesa, Cowal, & Pulju, 2022). In this poster, we present an AAL case study in which students of applied linguistics partner with the Oregon Judicial Department (OJD) for the purpose of increasing access to justice for Oregonians trying to navigate the Informal Domestic Relations Trial system. In conversation with OJD staff and building off of their OJD website, we employ multi-modal semiotic theory (Kress & van Leeuwen in Jovanovic, 2015), universal design (CAST, 2018) and plain language (Kimble, 2007) to create informational visuals that are more accessible to the public. Our poster gives examples of “befores” and “afters” of materials about Informal Domestic Relations Trials. We also present feedback from OJD and discuss the take-aways from this experience and provide suggestions for further research.

Anesa, P., Cowal J., & Pulju, K. (2022) Improving the accessibility of legal information online through community engagement. Digitalization and Institutionalization of Legal Knowledge. Luttermann, K., Engberg, J., Münster et al. LIT Verlag

CAST (2018). Universal Design for Learning Guidelines version 2.2. Retrieved from http://udlguidelines.cast.org

Cowal, J., & Leung, G. (2021). Activist applied linguistics. In S. Conrad, A.J. Hartig, & L. Santelmann (Eds.). The Cambridge introduction to applied linguistics (pp. 308-324). Cambridge University Press.

Haeffner, M., & Cowal, J. (2019). A case study of OregonWaterStories.com: Exploring agency with water justice, activist applied linguistics, and a community partner. Case Studies in the Environment, 3. https://doi.org/10.1525/cse.2018.001685

Jovanovic, Danica. 2015. “Important people in multimodality theory.” In Key Terms in Multimodality: Definitions, Issues, Discussions, edited by Nina Nørgaard. www.sdu.dk/multimodalkeyterms. Retrieved 03/05/2022

Kimble, J. (2007). "Lifting the fog of legalese : essays on plain language". Thomas M. Cooley Law School.

Rittel, W., & Webber, M. (1973). Dilemmas in a general theory

of planning. Policy Science. (pp. 155–169). doi:10.1007/bf01405730.