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Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-5-2022 11:00 AM

End Date

4-5-2022 1:00 PM

Subjects

AAC, pre-service education, speech-language pathology, graduate studies

Advisor

Brandon Eddy

Student Level

Post Baccalaureate

Abstract

Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) is an area of clinical practice that supplements or compensates for impairments in speech-language production and/or comprehension (ASHA, n.d.). A survey study by Johnson and Prebor (2019) found 86% of graduate speech-language pathology (SLP) programs offered an AAC course, though half (49%) suggested their students were underprepared to provide AAC services. High-quality graduate training, including AAC coursework, has been suggested as a solution to prepare clinicians to provide AAC services. Recently, Sauerwein and Burris (2021) surveyed AAC course instructors at accredited SLP graduate programs to analyze AAC course design features. Sixty-four (24.2%) programs responded to their survey. However, their study did not consider credit hours or term length which may impact course features. Further, the closed-ended survey questions may have resulted in missed unique course design features. This study expands upon previous work by evaluating AAC course syllabi and course calendars rather than survey responses, and analyzing course features while considering credit hours and course length. Accredited SLP graduate programs (236) were invited via email and/or phone to provide their syllabi and course calendars; ninety (38%) programs provided their materials. Analyses are ongoing and full results will be presented at the PSU Research Symposium. Syllabi and calendars will be evaluated for features including course delivery, learning objectives and content, case-based instruction, assignments and activities, readings, resources (Sauerwein & Burris, 2021), and additional features. The results of this project can be used by AAC course instructors to improve pre-service education.

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/37472

English.srt (18 kB)
English Captions for Recorded Presentation

Goodbody_Broderick_Research Poster 2022_44x36.pdf (832 kB)
Research Poster

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May 4th, 11:00 AM May 4th, 1:00 PM

Augmentative and Alternative Communication Course Design and Features: An Analysis of Course Syllabi and Calendars

Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) is an area of clinical practice that supplements or compensates for impairments in speech-language production and/or comprehension (ASHA, n.d.). A survey study by Johnson and Prebor (2019) found 86% of graduate speech-language pathology (SLP) programs offered an AAC course, though half (49%) suggested their students were underprepared to provide AAC services. High-quality graduate training, including AAC coursework, has been suggested as a solution to prepare clinicians to provide AAC services. Recently, Sauerwein and Burris (2021) surveyed AAC course instructors at accredited SLP graduate programs to analyze AAC course design features. Sixty-four (24.2%) programs responded to their survey. However, their study did not consider credit hours or term length which may impact course features. Further, the closed-ended survey questions may have resulted in missed unique course design features. This study expands upon previous work by evaluating AAC course syllabi and course calendars rather than survey responses, and analyzing course features while considering credit hours and course length. Accredited SLP graduate programs (236) were invited via email and/or phone to provide their syllabi and course calendars; ninety (38%) programs provided their materials. Analyses are ongoing and full results will be presented at the PSU Research Symposium. Syllabi and calendars will be evaluated for features including course delivery, learning objectives and content, case-based instruction, assignments and activities, readings, resources (Sauerwein & Burris, 2021), and additional features. The results of this project can be used by AAC course instructors to improve pre-service education.