Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-5-2022 11:00 AM

End Date

4-5-2022 1:00 PM

Subjects

promotive and prohibitive voice, approach and avoidance disposition, perceived efficacy

Advisor

Dr. Amy Pytlovany

Student Level

Post Baccalaureate

Abstract

Developments in research on promotive and prohibitive voice in workplaces have important implications for organizational innovation and prevention of unethical behavior. Drawing on theory that approach and avoidance dispositions predict promotive and prohibitive voice, and mediate the effect of a sense of powerfulness or powerlessness to predict voice or silence, the proposed study hypothesizes that approach and avoidance disposition will explain differential effects of personal sense of power on an employee’s perceived efficacy of promotive and prohibitive voice. 200 front-line restaurant workers will be recruited and randomly assigned to receive a (1) powerful prime, (2) powerless prime, or (3) control prime. A regression analysis of variance will be conducted in SPSS to test hypotheses that there will be a positive correlation between sense of powerfulness and (1a) promotive and (1b) prohibitive voice efficacy, and a negative correlation between powerlessness and (2a) promotive and (2b) prohibitive voice efficacy. Hayes’ PROCESS macro will be used to test moderation hypotheses such that an approach disposition will increase (3a) promotive and (3b) prohibitive voice efficacy, and an avoidance disposition will decrease (4a) promotive, but not (4b) prohibitive voice efficacy. In addition to its contribution to literature on the relationship between sense of power, voice, and disposition, significant findings would help 1) identify how to support employees’ suggestions and concerns specific to disposition, 2) predict efficacy of voice in organizational hierarchies relative to sense of power, and 3) develop interventions for innovation and safety based on the effects of disposition and power on promotive and prohibitive voice.

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/37500

Included in

Psychology Commons

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May 4th, 11:00 AM May 4th, 1:00 PM

The Effects of Approach and Avoidance Dispositions and Sense of Power on Promotive and Prohibitive Voice Efficacy

Developments in research on promotive and prohibitive voice in workplaces have important implications for organizational innovation and prevention of unethical behavior. Drawing on theory that approach and avoidance dispositions predict promotive and prohibitive voice, and mediate the effect of a sense of powerfulness or powerlessness to predict voice or silence, the proposed study hypothesizes that approach and avoidance disposition will explain differential effects of personal sense of power on an employee’s perceived efficacy of promotive and prohibitive voice. 200 front-line restaurant workers will be recruited and randomly assigned to receive a (1) powerful prime, (2) powerless prime, or (3) control prime. A regression analysis of variance will be conducted in SPSS to test hypotheses that there will be a positive correlation between sense of powerfulness and (1a) promotive and (1b) prohibitive voice efficacy, and a negative correlation between powerlessness and (2a) promotive and (2b) prohibitive voice efficacy. Hayes’ PROCESS macro will be used to test moderation hypotheses such that an approach disposition will increase (3a) promotive and (3b) prohibitive voice efficacy, and an avoidance disposition will decrease (4a) promotive, but not (4b) prohibitive voice efficacy. In addition to its contribution to literature on the relationship between sense of power, voice, and disposition, significant findings would help 1) identify how to support employees’ suggestions and concerns specific to disposition, 2) predict efficacy of voice in organizational hierarchies relative to sense of power, and 3) develop interventions for innovation and safety based on the effects of disposition and power on promotive and prohibitive voice.