Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-5-2022 11:00 AM

End Date

4-5-2022 1:00 PM

Subjects

stress; students; daily diary

Advisor

Tori Crain

Student Level

Doctoral

Abstract

A substantial body of literature exists that examines work, nonwork, and stress in employed adults. Less is known about experiences of stress in adolescents and emerging adults. The goal of the present study is to examine the association between daily activities and next day stress within a sample of students. We propose that students use their personal resources to meet school demands, and then need to replenish those resources, or stress may ensure. One aim of this study is to examine the relationship of hours of exercise and sleep with students’ reports of stress the next day. Additionally, many students maintain employment. This study will also address the association of employment with the relationships between sleep, exercise, and stress in students. We hypothesize that 1) on days when participants exercise, stress will be decreased the next day, 2) on days when participants sleep more, stress will be decreased the next day, and 3) these relationships will be weakened a) when students are employed and b) on days following a workday. Participants were undergraduate students and adolescents, aged 14 to 21. Over seven days, participants reported stress and the time spent daily on exercise, sleep, and work. Multilevel regression analyses will be conducted to examine the within-person effects of exercise and sleep on stress, in addition to whether the between-person variable of employment and the within-person variable of workday moderates these associations. Results from this study will inform future stress interventions at both the school and organizational level.

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/37477

Included in

Psychology Commons

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May 4th, 11:00 AM May 4th, 1:00 PM

Daily Work, Nonwork, and Stress Experiences of Students

A substantial body of literature exists that examines work, nonwork, and stress in employed adults. Less is known about experiences of stress in adolescents and emerging adults. The goal of the present study is to examine the association between daily activities and next day stress within a sample of students. We propose that students use their personal resources to meet school demands, and then need to replenish those resources, or stress may ensure. One aim of this study is to examine the relationship of hours of exercise and sleep with students’ reports of stress the next day. Additionally, many students maintain employment. This study will also address the association of employment with the relationships between sleep, exercise, and stress in students. We hypothesize that 1) on days when participants exercise, stress will be decreased the next day, 2) on days when participants sleep more, stress will be decreased the next day, and 3) these relationships will be weakened a) when students are employed and b) on days following a workday. Participants were undergraduate students and adolescents, aged 14 to 21. Over seven days, participants reported stress and the time spent daily on exercise, sleep, and work. Multilevel regression analyses will be conducted to examine the within-person effects of exercise and sleep on stress, in addition to whether the between-person variable of employment and the within-person variable of workday moderates these associations. Results from this study will inform future stress interventions at both the school and organizational level.