Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

4-5-2022 9:00 AM

End Date

4-5-2022 11:00 AM

Subjects

Civic Capacity, Food Waste Recovery and Reintegration, Composting, Policy Adoption

Other

Civic Leadership

Advisor

Kevin Kecskes, PhD

Student Level

Undergraduate

Abstract

The US Food System is complex and multi-layered, containing many areas for improvement. My research focuses specifically on the issue area of food waste. On a global and national scale mitigating food waste can seem too large to manage. Containing complexity across multiple sectors and with extended timelines for improvements, it is indeed a wicked problem, a problem which in its complexity is almost impossible to fully distinguish or address with one (or even multiple) solutions. (Rittel, 1973). However, when we look to local, place-based solutions we can develop more realistic and actionable plans. The state of Oregon is equipped to cut food waste loss by 50% within the next 10 years but will need to tap into existing civic capacity to reach this intended goal. In the following, I will critically evaluate and offer recommendations for the current Oregon Metro and City of Portland policy on local food waste recovery and reintegration. Just as important as the policy itself, I will explore the abilities of the City of Portland and Oregon Metro to establish principles of collaborative governance and polity leadership to act as a centering-agent in helping support the regions’ civic capacity towards implementing policy and successfully manage Sustainable Development Goals.

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/37516

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May 4th, 9:00 AM May 4th, 11:00 AM

Evaluation of Oregon’s Food Waste Recovery and Reintegration Policy Adoption through Civic Capacity

The US Food System is complex and multi-layered, containing many areas for improvement. My research focuses specifically on the issue area of food waste. On a global and national scale mitigating food waste can seem too large to manage. Containing complexity across multiple sectors and with extended timelines for improvements, it is indeed a wicked problem, a problem which in its complexity is almost impossible to fully distinguish or address with one (or even multiple) solutions. (Rittel, 1973). However, when we look to local, place-based solutions we can develop more realistic and actionable plans. The state of Oregon is equipped to cut food waste loss by 50% within the next 10 years but will need to tap into existing civic capacity to reach this intended goal. In the following, I will critically evaluate and offer recommendations for the current Oregon Metro and City of Portland policy on local food waste recovery and reintegration. Just as important as the policy itself, I will explore the abilities of the City of Portland and Oregon Metro to establish principles of collaborative governance and polity leadership to act as a centering-agent in helping support the regions’ civic capacity towards implementing policy and successfully manage Sustainable Development Goals.