Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

5-8-2024 11:00 AM

End Date

5-8-2024 1:00 PM

Subjects

Radio Frequency, Deuterium ions, Anodes

Advisor

Erik J. Sanchez

Student Level

Doctoral

Abstract

It is well known that a plasma can be created with both high input power and ultra low pressure. The challenge is in creating these same plasma characteristics with both lower power while maintaining a higher pressure. We have developed an ion beam by careful manipulation of magnetic and electric fields. Magnetic fields are used to accelerate ambient electrons to ionize the low pressure gas into a plasma. Electric fields are used to extract the ions into a focused beam. To achieve these initial ionizations, an artificial vacuum is created to reach low enough pressures to ionize the gas. A specialized chamber has been machined to hold this vacuum and has several ports for necessary instrument measurements. Separate electrical modules have been created to aid in the transmission of data with data acquisition cards displaying a real-time user interface that supervises and controls the magnetic and electric fields, flow of gas, and vacuum pressure. Various applications using this ion beam stem from different gases including nitrogen, oxygen, argon, xenon, and deuterium for uses in imaging, milling, implantation, and nuclear fusion.

Creative Commons License or Rights Statement

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Share

COinS
 
May 8th, 11:00 AM May 8th, 1:00 PM

Plasma Ion Source

It is well known that a plasma can be created with both high input power and ultra low pressure. The challenge is in creating these same plasma characteristics with both lower power while maintaining a higher pressure. We have developed an ion beam by careful manipulation of magnetic and electric fields. Magnetic fields are used to accelerate ambient electrons to ionize the low pressure gas into a plasma. Electric fields are used to extract the ions into a focused beam. To achieve these initial ionizations, an artificial vacuum is created to reach low enough pressures to ionize the gas. A specialized chamber has been machined to hold this vacuum and has several ports for necessary instrument measurements. Separate electrical modules have been created to aid in the transmission of data with data acquisition cards displaying a real-time user interface that supervises and controls the magnetic and electric fields, flow of gas, and vacuum pressure. Various applications using this ion beam stem from different gases including nitrogen, oxygen, argon, xenon, and deuterium for uses in imaging, milling, implantation, and nuclear fusion.