Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

5-8-2024 11:00 AM

End Date

5-8-2024 1:00 PM

Subjects

Sociology, Education, Immigration, Social justice

Advisor

Dara Shifrer

Student Level

Undergraduate

Abstract

Introduction

Math is a subject that is often perceived as challenging and sometimes referred to as a universal language because the symbols and organization are the same from country to country. However, immigrant students can face obstacles such as language barriers that can make math even more challenging regardless of the universal language belief.

Methods

This research integrates the data from the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 on 20,000 ninth graders. The ninth graders were asked questions about math and their feelings on the subject.

Results

Among students with the highest scores on the standardized math test, the math self-efficacy of third-generation-plus immigrants is 0.30 higher on average than that of first-generation immigrants and the math self-efficacy of second-generation immigrants is 0.03 lower on average than that of first-generation immigrants. Low-scoring second-generation immigrants have lower math efficacy than low-scoring first-generation immigrants and low-scoring third-generation-plus immigrants having much lower levels of math efficacy than low-scoring first-generation immigrants.

Conclusion

Understanding the attitudes of immigrant ninth graders towards math is important as it can provide insights into their academic performance and overall well-being. By analyzing these attitudes, educators and policymakers can better tailor their interventions or programs to meet the needs of immigrant students, ultimately helping them succeed academically.

Creative Commons License or Rights Statement

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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May 8th, 11:00 AM May 8th, 1:00 PM

Differences In Ninth Graders’ Attitudes Towards Math Depending On Immigrant-Generation Status

Introduction

Math is a subject that is often perceived as challenging and sometimes referred to as a universal language because the symbols and organization are the same from country to country. However, immigrant students can face obstacles such as language barriers that can make math even more challenging regardless of the universal language belief.

Methods

This research integrates the data from the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 on 20,000 ninth graders. The ninth graders were asked questions about math and their feelings on the subject.

Results

Among students with the highest scores on the standardized math test, the math self-efficacy of third-generation-plus immigrants is 0.30 higher on average than that of first-generation immigrants and the math self-efficacy of second-generation immigrants is 0.03 lower on average than that of first-generation immigrants. Low-scoring second-generation immigrants have lower math efficacy than low-scoring first-generation immigrants and low-scoring third-generation-plus immigrants having much lower levels of math efficacy than low-scoring first-generation immigrants.

Conclusion

Understanding the attitudes of immigrant ninth graders towards math is important as it can provide insights into their academic performance and overall well-being. By analyzing these attitudes, educators and policymakers can better tailor their interventions or programs to meet the needs of immigrant students, ultimately helping them succeed academically.