Modeling Of Carbon Dioxide In Portland

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

5-8-2024 11:00 AM

End Date

5-8-2024 1:00 PM

Subjects

Air quality, Carbon dioxide -- Research -- Portland (Or.), Climatic changes

Advisor

Christopher Butenhoff

Student Level

Masters

Abstract

Cities rely on accurate CO2 data and urban air-quality simulations for both policy making and pollution monitoring and control. Despite the need for accurate data sets and validated models, existing CO2 inventories are known to be flawed and reliable data sets are limited.

We use WRF-Chem to analyze and simulate CO2 mixing and transport in the Portland-metro area. We use existing CO2 measurements from PSU, Sauvie Island, and SE Portland, combined with weather measurements from the EPA to set starting conditions for our model. By identifying and using weather and particle data from nearby stations as input, we simulate the flow of chemicals in the atmosphere, comparing it to measured data.

By quantifying and validating CO2 emissions in Portland, we provide cities with the tools needed to better inform urban policy development, verify pollution targets, and improve overall urban air quality. Additionally, this analysis contributes to the scientific understanding of urban atmospheric conditions and enables city leaders to make more informed policy decisions that benefit local residents and the worldwide environment.

Creative Commons License or Rights Statement

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 8th, 11:00 AM May 8th, 1:00 PM

Modeling Of Carbon Dioxide In Portland

Cities rely on accurate CO2 data and urban air-quality simulations for both policy making and pollution monitoring and control. Despite the need for accurate data sets and validated models, existing CO2 inventories are known to be flawed and reliable data sets are limited.

We use WRF-Chem to analyze and simulate CO2 mixing and transport in the Portland-metro area. We use existing CO2 measurements from PSU, Sauvie Island, and SE Portland, combined with weather measurements from the EPA to set starting conditions for our model. By identifying and using weather and particle data from nearby stations as input, we simulate the flow of chemicals in the atmosphere, comparing it to measured data.

By quantifying and validating CO2 emissions in Portland, we provide cities with the tools needed to better inform urban policy development, verify pollution targets, and improve overall urban air quality. Additionally, this analysis contributes to the scientific understanding of urban atmospheric conditions and enables city leaders to make more informed policy decisions that benefit local residents and the worldwide environment.