Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

5-8-2024 1:00 PM

End Date

5-8-2024 3:00 PM

Subjects

Linguistics

Advisor

Steve Thorne

Student Level

Masters

Abstract

YouTube videos have contributed primary and supplementary instructional materials to traditional classrooms since the 2010s (Sylvia & Moody, 2022). These internet-native materials are more successful than their traditional counterparts due to their recontextualization which melds dissemination with the semiotic landscape of web 2.0 culture.

Preferential treatment towards long-form, research-based content has facilitated the development of the YouTube video essay format: a grassroots practice that unapologetically embeds identity, pop culture, and humor with rigorous scholarly praxis and remediation of major elements of academic discourse (Davis, 2022). Videos of this type regularly reach “audiences which may rival or dwarf the enrollment of [...] the largest of universities” (Davis, 2022, p. 16).

This presentation draws on a blend of journalistic and academic sources to establish the context of the emerging format. It then employs The New London Group’s model of Design (1996) to descriptively analyze 6 essays, answering the following question:

What are salient features that emerge in this practice, and what role do they play in the recontextualization of academic knowledge?

Influenced by the performative research paradigm (Haseman, 2006) and multiliteracies pedagogy (The New London Group, 1996), this work illustrates web 2.0’s affordances as a site for the democratization of academic knowledge.

Creative Commons License or Rights Statement

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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May 8th, 1:00 PM May 8th, 3:00 PM

YouTube Video Essays as Critical Remixed Scholarship

YouTube videos have contributed primary and supplementary instructional materials to traditional classrooms since the 2010s (Sylvia & Moody, 2022). These internet-native materials are more successful than their traditional counterparts due to their recontextualization which melds dissemination with the semiotic landscape of web 2.0 culture.

Preferential treatment towards long-form, research-based content has facilitated the development of the YouTube video essay format: a grassroots practice that unapologetically embeds identity, pop culture, and humor with rigorous scholarly praxis and remediation of major elements of academic discourse (Davis, 2022). Videos of this type regularly reach “audiences which may rival or dwarf the enrollment of [...] the largest of universities” (Davis, 2022, p. 16).

This presentation draws on a blend of journalistic and academic sources to establish the context of the emerging format. It then employs The New London Group’s model of Design (1996) to descriptively analyze 6 essays, answering the following question:

What are salient features that emerge in this practice, and what role do they play in the recontextualization of academic knowledge?

Influenced by the performative research paradigm (Haseman, 2006) and multiliteracies pedagogy (The New London Group, 1996), this work illustrates web 2.0’s affordances as a site for the democratization of academic knowledge.